Google Agonizes on Privacy as Ad World Vaults Ahead

From “net neutrality” to a Google “vision statement” that questions the ethics of the mega company. Next step… you know what I’m about to say right… world domination!

Amplify’d from www.wallstreetjournal.com

A confidential, seven-page Google Inc. “vision statement” shows the information-age giant in a deep round of soul-searching over a basic question: How far should it go in profiting from its crown jewels—the vast trove of data it possesses about people’s activities?

Jessica Vascellaro talks to Simon Constable about the big privacy issue facing Google — how far should it go in profiting from its crown jewels-the vast trove of data it possesses about people’s activities? Plus, is Mark Hurd a good fit for Nokia.

Should it tap more of what it knows about Gmail users? Should it build a vast “trading platform” for buying and selling Web data? Should it let people pay to not see any ads at all?

These and other ideas big and small—the third one was listed under “wacky”—are discussed in the document, which was reviewed by The Wall Street Journal and compiled in late 2008 by Aitan Weinberg, now a senior product manager for interest-based advertising. Along with interviews with more than a dozen current and former employees, the vision statement offers a candid, introspective look at Google’s fight to remain at the vanguard of the information economy.

Google: Into the Future

Read excerpts from Google’s internal planning document.

Read more at www.wallstreetjournal.com

 

New York Mag Links Up With Foursquare. Have you checked in lately?

A magazine taking advantage of location-based social networking. I have to say this is genius. I can see an immediate link between an actual venue an geo-location sites… but a magazine? Hats off to their digital, marketing or whatever department came up with this partnership.

Amplify’d from www.mediaweek.com

mw/photos/stylus/112207-NewYorkMagM.jpg

New York magazine’s Web site nymag.com has linked up with Foursquare,becoming the latest in a rash of traditional media companies tohook up with the location-based social networking service.
 
Users of the service can “check in” when they visit localbusinesses, alerting friends of their location while earning pointsthat can be redeemed for perks at the business. In recent months,The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and Time Out New Yorkhave partnered with Foursquare to distribute news and othereditorial content.
 
New York magazine is using Foursquare to grow the audience for itspopular restaurant, bargains and nightlife listings, data thatcurrently drive 10 percent of its Web traffic.
 
New York’s followers on Foursquare—which number 7,000—will haveaccess to tips from the magazine’s online database that includes5,000 restaurants, 1,600 bars and 5,500 stores.Read more at www.mediaweek.com

New York Mag Links Up With Foursquare. Have you checked in lately?

A magazine taking advantage of location-based social networking. I have to say this is genius. I can see an immediate link between an actual venue an geo-location sites… but a magazine? Hats off to their digital, marketing or whatever department came up with this partnership.

Amplify’d from www.mediaweek.com

mw/photos/stylus/112207-NewYorkMagM.jpg

New York magazine’s Web site nymag.com has linked up with Foursquare,
becoming the latest in a rash of traditional media companies to
hook up with the location-based social networking service.
 
Users of the service can “check in” when they visit local
businesses, alerting friends of their location while earning points
that can be redeemed for perks at the business. In recent months,
The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and Time Out New York
have partnered with Foursquare to distribute news and other
editorial content.
 
New York magazine is using Foursquare to grow the audience for its
popular restaurant, bargains and nightlife listings, data that
currently drive 10 percent of its Web traffic.
 
New York’s followers on Foursquare—which number 7,000—will have
access to tips from the magazine’s online database that includes
5,000 restaurants, 1,600 bars and 5,500 stores.Read more at www.mediaweek.com