Tag Archives: Smartphones

Apple Sends Ripples Through Tech World

According to Wired.com, Apples earnings are “staggering”. They reported “Apple posted March-quarter revenue of $24.67 billion — meaning the company is well on its way toward exceeding $100 billion in sales for the full-year. In the last three months, Apple earned a whopping $5.99 billion. Both the revenue and earnings figures were new records for Apple.”

“With quarterly revenue growth of 83 percent and profit growth of 95 percent, we’re firing on all cylinders,” said Steve Jobs, Apple’s CEO, in a statement. “We will continue to innovate on all fronts throughout the remainder of the year.”

Apple is clearly the one to beat and just in case you are keeping score, below is a look at how some of the other companies are doing in comparison.

Amplify’d from m.apnews.com

NEW YORK (AP) – Consumer technology companies reporting financial results this week are looking like rowboats bobbing in the wake of Apple Inc.’s supertanker.

Close to oblivion in 1997, Apple is now the world’s second-most valuable company, after Exxon Mobil Corp. On April 20, it reported net income of $5.99 billion for the January-to-March period, nearly double that of a year ago. It shipped a record 18.65 million iPhones during the quarter. Its iPad tablet computers are so popular, the company couldn’t make enough.

Apple’s ascendancy has produced many losers and a few winners, as underscored over the past two weeks:

– Microsoft Corp.: loser.

Apple dethroned Microsoft as the world’s most valuable technology company a year ago. In its mid-fall report, it surpassed Microsoft in quarterly revenue. In the January-March period this year, it surpassed Microsoft in net income, too.

On Thursday, Microsoft reported that revenue from the Windows operating system declined for the second straight quarter because people are buying fewer Windows computers.

Some prospective buyers are going to Macs instead – Apple reported that it sold 28 percent more units. Others are going to iPads. Goldman Sachs now believes that more than 30 percent of iPads sold may be replacing PC sales. In the 90s, the trend was the opposite, as Windows PCs were crowding out Macs.

– Nokia Corp.: loser.

Nokia said this week that it will slash 7,000 jobs through layoffs and outsourcing. It still sells more phones than anyone else, but it’s losing share to Apple, especially when it comes to smartphones.

Research firm Strategy Analytics also said revenue from Apple’s iPhone sales surpassed that of Nokia’s phones in the January-to-March period, as iPhones are much more expensive than the average Nokia phone. That makes Apple the world’s largest phone maker by revenue.

To better compete with the iPhone, Nokia is ditching its old Symbian software and adopting Microsoft’s Windows Phone 7. But the transition will take time; the first Windows-powered Nokia phones aren’t expected until late 2011 or early 2012.

– Research In Motion Ltd.: loser.

The maker of the BlackBerry is in a predicament that’s similar to Nokia’s. RIM warned Thursday that net income, revenue and unit sales for the quarter ending in May will come in below its previous forecast.

The company’s high-end phones are looking old compared with the iPhone and ones running Google Inc.’s Android software. They aren’t selling as well as the company expected.

RIM promised investors that new phones with revamped software will bring sales roaring back in the latter half of the year, but investors are skeptical, sending RIM’s stock down Friday.

– HTC Corp., Samsung Electronics Co. and Motorola Mobility Holdings Inc.: winners, indirectly.

Although all three companies compete with Apple’s iPhone, they are doing well. Unlike Nokia and RIM, the three are betting on Google’s Android system, which comes the closest to mimicking the look, feel and functions of the iPhone.

Motorola Mobility is a shadow of the old Motorola, once the world’s second-largest maker of phones. But its focus on Android-powered smartphones is showing signs of success. It reported on Thursday a near-doubling of smartphone sales in the first quarter.

HTC of Taiwan has been making smartphones for a decade, and sales are really taking off with the help of Android. On Friday, it reported selling 9.7 million in the first quarter.

For South Korea’s Samsung, smartphone sales were a bright spot in the first quarter as overall phone sales declined and other electronics were weak. The company is embroiled in patent litigation with Apple.

– Verizon Wireless: winner.

The No. 1 U.S. cellphone carrier posted a jump in new contract-signing customers – the more profitable kind – after it introduced its version of the iPhone on Feb. 10, which ended AT&T Inc.’s exclusive grip on the device in the U.S.

(Verizon Wireless is a joint venture of Verizon Communications Inc. of New York and Vodafone Group PLC of Britain.)

– AT&T and Sprint Nextel Corp: mixed.

Verizon’s new subscribers came at the expense of AT&T and Sprint Nextel Corp. But neither carrier saw signs of current customers moving to Verizon for the sake of the iPhone. Rather, it seems customers weighing between carriers were more likely to go to Verizon because of the iPhone.

AT&T appeared to be splitting new iPhone customers evenly with Verizon Wireless.

Read more at m.apnews.com

 

5 Biggest Losers as Smartphone Sales Surpass PCs

According to research firm Gartner, last quarters impressive personal computer sales pale in comparison to an even faster growing Smartphone market. So, again I ask, to Macbook Pro or do I hold out for the iPad 2?

Amplify’d from gigaom.com

More than 93.4 million personal computers shipped around the globe in the final quarter of 2010, with HP leading the pack of vendors and holding 18.8 percent of the market. Acer, Dell, Lenovo, and Toshiba rounded out the top five, combining for 58.3 percent of the overall PC market last quarter, according to research firm Gartner. Such sales numbers might be cause for celebration except for one problem: Not one of these companies has a significant presence in the even faster growing smartphone market.

Just how big is the market for pocketable computers — a market the computer industry has had a three-decade head start on? I haven’t yet seen fourth quarter smartphone sales estimates, so we can’t make a direct comparison, but Gartner’s third quarter numbers from last year show that 80.5 million smartphones were sold. That’s nearly equal to the 88.3 million computers shipped in the third quarter, just about 10 percent higher than that of smartphones.

Another startling datapoint to illustrate the challenge faced by PC makers: The up-and-coming Taiwanese company, HTC, expects to sell 60 million smartphones in 2011, which alone would rival the entire 62.7 million computers Gartner says HP sold in 2010. And of course, one can point to nearly 40 million iPhones sold by Apple in its 2010 fiscal year, or roughly three times the 13.6 million Mac computers sold during by Apple in the same period, showing that Apple has a clearer understanding that the future is mobile. Apple has devoted much effort towards iOS devices and is even bringing iOS concepts to its upcoming desktop upgrade called OS X Lion.

These sales trends have been in the works for a few years now, so it’s not surprising that smartphones are about to surpass PC sales, if they actually haven’t already. What is surprising however, is that those top five computer manufacturers aren’t even in the conversation when discussing smartphones. Sure, Dell is starting to get in the game with both Android smartphones and tablets, but it’s not a top-tier brand in either yet. Toshiba and Acer have been in and out of the smartphone game in the past, both using Microsoft Windows Mobile at the time, and that hasn’t worked out either. Acer has since tried to use Android, but its name isn’t on the tip of my tongue when talking about hot phones.

That leaves Lenovo and HP, each of which has their own potential plan to remain relevant in a mobile future. Lenovo is leveraging its home base in China, an area ripe for handset growth, even after it sold its smartphone division in 2008 and then paid double to buy it back 18 months later. But the company hasn’t yet pushed its smartphone strategy beyond the borders of China, where it faces competition from a growing number of cheap Android handsets.

Meanwhile, HP purchased Palm in April of last year for $1.2 billion to get a foot in the door for smartphones, tablets and other devices running on the Palm webOS platform. No new webOS products have come from the purchase yet, but next month, HP is holding an event where it’s expected to debut updated mobile gadgets. Even so, the webOS platform is still far behind the bigger players, such as Android and iOS, when it comes to available apps.

Ultimately, all five of these traditional computer makers are big losers when it comes to the smartphone market right now, although some still have slivers of opportunity available. The longer they cling to lower-margin desktops and laptops, however, the more they risk irrelevancy in the future. And if the comparison in device sales numbers don’t wake them up, maybe innovative accessories that turn smartphones into little laptops, such as the Motorola Atrix 4G dock shown above, will sound the warning bells.

Read more at gigaom.com

 

The Heart of Tomorrow’s High-Tech Cars: Smartphones

Last week, even GM’s OnStar decided to take the “if you can’t beat ’em, join ’em” approach, announcing that it would start running popular smartphone apps such as the social-networking phenomenon Facebook and online music service Pandora on its connected car systems. I’m still not sure WHY?!?

Amplify’d from www.foxnews.com

Jeffrey Sauger/General Motors

Rather than struggle to keep pace with new technology, car manufacturers are increasingly relying on smartphones to provide tech features.

While technology races ahead, gear built into cars is increasingly left in the dust. And that’s about to change: Your car is about to join the app revolution.

For years, car manufacturers have struggled to keep pace with new technology. They add old wireless connections even as faster, newer standards are introduced. They hide hard drives in headrests while larger, cheaper drives keep coming out.

Just look at GPS navigation: A new $170 portable navigation device is more accurate and has more features than the built-in $2,000 option the dealership wants to sell you. That’s because it takes years for a car to make it from the drawing board to the showroom, while new gadgets and apps appear every day.

So automakers like BMW, Ford, and GM are changing their tack. Instead of trying to stuff dashboards with the latest technology, like gigabytes of memory or dedicated computer systems, they’re designing more streamlined systems that simply connect to drivers’ smartphones. 

The idea is to rely on those devices to provide the communications

and computing power to deliver new services and features. After all, what’s more current, your iPhone or your 6-year-old SUV — which was designed before there was such a thing as Facebook, or Twitter?

Read more at www.foxnews.com

Are iPads, smartphones, and the Mobile Web rewiring the way we think?

I’m not prepared to give up my gadgets for a week but I know that if I needed to I could. I can quite anytime (isn’t that what all addicts say?). It seems today’s technology may be determining not only how much or how often we are “plugged in” but it could be “rewiring” our entire thought process and how we experience the real world as we surf through the virtual one.

Amplify’d from www.csmonitor.com

 

A laptop becomes a hand-held device in Cambridge, Mass. Is the way we think evolving because of iPads, smartphones, and the Mobile Web?

Taylor Weidman/Staff


 

By

Gregory M. Lamb, / Staff writer /
July 24, 2010

It took an offer to appear on a national TV show for Wade Warren to reluctantly give up what he calls his “technology” for a week.

Skip to next paragraph

This is article is part of the cover story package for the July 26, 2010, edition of The Christian Science Monitor weekly magazine.

Photo illustration: Staff

That was the only way, his mother says, that he would ever pack his 2006 MacBook (with some recent upgrades, he’ll tell you), his iPad tablet computer, and, most regretfully, his Nexus One smart phone into a cardboard box and watch them be hustled out the door of his room to a secret hiding place.

Wade, who’s 14 and heading into ninth grade, survived his seven days of technological withdrawal without updating his 136 Twitter followers about “wonky math tests” and “interesting fort escapades,” or posting on his photography product review blog, or texting his friends about… well, that’s private. But he has returned to his screens with a vengeance, making up for lost time.

Today’s technology may be determining not just how we spend our time: It actually may be “rewiring” the way we think, how we experience the world around us.

Techno-Cassandras fret over what’s happening to our attention spans, our ability to think and read deeply, to enjoy time with our own thoughts or a good book.

Techno-enthusiasts scoff that those concerns are nothing new: Socrates, it’s pointed out, thought that writing itself would harm a person’s ability to internalize learning, the printed word acting as a substitute for true understanding. Technologies such as printing, and in recent decades television and the pocket calculator, have all served time as villains only to become innocuous, commonplace parts of modern life. Why should helpful new technologies from Facebook and Twitter to iPhones and laptops be any different?

Are iPads, smartphones, and the Mobile Web rewiring the way we think?

I’m not prepared to give up my gadgets for a week but I know that if I needed to I could. I can quite anytime (isn’t that what all addicts say?). It seems today’s technology may be determining not only how much or how often we are “plugged in” but it could be “rewiring” our entire thought process and how we experience the real world as we surf through the virtual one.

Amplify’d from www.csmonitor.com

A laptop becomes a hand-held device in Cambridge, Mass. Is the way we think evolving because of iPads, smartphones, and the Mobile Web?

Taylor Weidman/Staff


Gregory M. Lamb, / Staff writer /
July 24, 2010

It took an offer to appear on a national TV show for Wade Warren to reluctantly give up what he calls his “technology” for a week.

Skip to next paragraph

This is article is part of the cover story package for the July 26, 2010, edition of The Christian Science Monitor weekly magazine.

Photo illustration: Staff

That was the only way, his mother says, that he would ever pack his 2006 MacBook (with some recent upgrades, he’ll tell you), his iPad tablet computer, and, most regretfully, his Nexus One smart phone into a cardboard box and watch them be hustled out the door of his room to a secret hiding place.

Wade, who’s 14 and heading into ninth grade, survived his seven days of technological withdrawal without updating his 136 Twitter followers about “wonky math tests” and “interesting fort escapades,” or posting on his photography product review blog, or texting his friends about… well, that’s private. But he has returned to his screens with a vengeance, making up for lost time.

Read more at www.csmonitor.com

Today’s technology may be determining not just how we spend our time: It actually may be “rewiring” the way we think, how we experience the world around us.

Techno-Cassandras fret over what’s happening to our attention spans, our ability to think and read deeply, to enjoy time with our own thoughts or a good book.

Techno-enthusiasts scoff that those concerns are nothing new: Socrates, it’s pointed out, thought that writing itself would harm a person’s ability to internalize learning, the printed word acting as a substitute for true understanding. Technologies such as printing, and in recent decades television and the pocket calculator, have all served time as villains only to become innocuous, commonplace parts of modern life. Why should helpful new technologies from Facebook and Twitter to iPhones and laptops be any different?

Are iPads, smartphones, and the Mobile Web rewiring the way we think?

I’m not prepared to give up my gadgets for a week but I know that if I needed to I could. I can quite anytime (isn’t that what all addicts say?). It seems today’s technology may be determining not only how much or how often we are “plugged in” but it could be “rewiring” our entire thought process and how we experience the real world as we surf through the virtual one.

Amplify’d from www.csmonitor.com

A laptop becomes a hand-held device in Cambridge, Mass. Is the way we think evolving because of iPads, smartphones, and the Mobile Web?

Taylor Weidman/Staff

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By

Gregory M. Lamb, / Staff writer /
July 24, 2010

It took an offer to appear on a national TV show for Wade Warren to reluctantly give up what he calls his “technology” for a week.

Skip to next paragraph

This is article is part of the cover story package for the July 26, 2010, edition of The Christian Science Monitor weekly magazine.

Photo illustration: Staff

Related Stories

That was the only way, his mother says, that he would ever pack his 2006 MacBook (with some recent upgrades, he’ll tell you), his iPad tablet computer, and, most regretfully, his Nexus One smart phone into a cardboard box and watch them be hustled out the door of his room to a secret hiding place.

Wade, who’s 14 and heading into ninth grade, survived his seven days of technological withdrawal without updating his 136 Twitter followers about “wonky math tests” and “interesting fort escapades,” or posting on his photography product review blog, or texting his friends about… well, that’s private. But he has returned to his screens with a vengeance, making up for lost time.

Read more at www.csmonitor.com

 

Google Nexus One is Nexus Last while HTC heads towards dominating the space!

So, uh… should I be purchasing an HTC? First I fall in love with my Blackberry, then my iPhone. Question, how many darn smartphones does one Geek Diva need to stay relevant?

So last week in less than six weeks from its launch, Microsoft killed its two first phone models and the whole handset project known as Kin. And before we have had time to even digest and understand all the undertones of that bizarre end to a ‘strategy’ we now see another death in the smartphones space.

GOOGLE NEXUS ONE IS NEXUS LAST

The CEO of Google, Eric Schmidt announced earlier this week that there won’t be another Nexus. No Nexus Two. So their first attempt at making a ‘superphone’ (that was a silly term for it) ended a superdud. And rather than try to learn and make it better (something Apple managed tremendously well where its original iPhone 2 was not being accepted internationally), Google decides to end its line of superphones. This is no doubt welcome news to all the 30 or so manufacturers who are committed to the Android platform, to see that Google is not going to compete with them. That initial launch of Nexus One with its ‘proprietary’ gains to the OS, seemed very unfair at the time. But as we ponder how poorly Google managed its smartphones on the Android platform, consider HTC here next.

HTC SALES JUMP AND PROFITS TOO

HTC announces a monster Q2 quarter. Remember that RIM grew its sales by 6% from Q1, a very healthy growth rate (and in the previous quarter from Q4 to Q1, Nokia grew 3% and Apple was flat) – HTC is now so hot, it grew 36% from Q1 to Q2. They sold 4.5 million smartphones. I make it that about 30% of all Android phones sold globally today are made by HTC.Read more at communities-dominate.blogs.com

Social Media And Gadget Trends

Google may be all about world domination but Facebook is running an impressive second.  According to Compete.com, Facbook passed Yahoo making the social networking site the number two most trafficked site after… wait for it… Google.  Facebook drew nearly 135 unique visitors in the January of 2010 and time spent on Facebook was twice that of time spent on Yahoo and Google.  I know I did my part to help them hit the number two spot!

Yahoo for years was the world’s most popular website — its ubiquitous portal has dominated the web since the 90s. Two years ago however, GoogleGoogleGoogle vaulted past Yahoo and became the Internet’s most popular destination. Last month, it became Facebook’sFacebookFacebook turn to knock Yahoo down another peg. via Mashable

In gadget news, BlackBerry is getting a cool new app.  Amazon has released a free Kindle application for BlackBerry smart phones and is planning to launch apps for Macs and the anticipated Apple iPad.  In other BlackBerry news, RIM developers have finally realized the worth of developing a Twitter app which falls under the “Duh” and “It’s About Time” heading.  I guess you could say better late than never but BB users have already taken sides on our favorite third-party Twitter BB apps and RIM is going to have a long way to go to get us to switch to an official BlackBerry app.

Finally, more computer makers are giving the tablet business a second look as we await the release of Apple’s iPad.  According to WSJ.com, Microsoft and Hewlett-Packard Co. have announce their devices and H-P is even looking to under cut the iPad price and release date.

H-P has discussed selling a version of the Slate—similar to the iPad in size and features, and including a cellular connection—for a price below the $629 Apple charges for an equivalent iPad, one of these people said.

Executives at Dell Inc., Acer Inc. and Sony Corp. say they are all watching Apple as they refine their own products. And Microsoft Corp. has a secretive team working on a two-screen tablet device, according to people familiar with the matter.There’s still plenty of skepticism about whether PC companies have the right products to compete against the iPad.  Many of the products risk being seen as “computers without keyboards,” in part because many of them run an operating system, Microsoft’s Windows 7, which is primarily aimed at traditional PC functions, said Forrester Research analyst James McQuivey. In contrast, the iPad’s software, which borrows heavily from the iPhone, is more tailored for consuming media on the go, he said.

However, I can’t help but think that all this open competition will no doubt give those of us who have been holding off on purchasing a tablet or eReader many more choices and choices are always a good thing.