Internet Gains on Television as Public’s Main News Source

I have to admit, I check my newspaper apps (which seems like an oxymoron) upon rising each day. If I find a national news story particularly interesting, I’ll head to the Internet long before I turn on the TV. I even turn to a TV station’s website long before I actually watch the news on TV. So, where do you get most of your national news from and what does this say about broadcast news?

Amplify’d from people-press.org

The internet is slowly closing in on television as Americans’ main source of national and international news. Currently, 41% say they get most of their news about national and international news from the internet, which is little changed over the past two years but up 17 points since 2007. Television remains the most widely used source for national and international news – 66% of Americans say it is their main source of news – but that is down from 74% three years ago and 82% as recently as 2002.

The national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press, conducted Dec. 1-5, 2010 among 1,500 adults reached on cell phones and landlines, finds that more people continue to cite the internet than newspapers as their main source of news, reflecting both the growth of the internet, and the gradual decline in newspaper readership (from 34% in 2007 to 31% now). The proportion citing radio as their main source of national and international news has remained relatively stable in recent years; currently, 16% say it is their main source.

An analysis of how different generations are getting their news suggests that these trends are likely to continue. In 2010, for the first time, the internet has surpassed television as the main source of national and international news for people younger than 30. Since 2007, the number of 18 to 29 year olds citing the internet as their main source has nearly doubled, from 34% to 65%. Over this period, the number of young people citing television as their main news source has dropped from 68% to 52%.

Among those 30 to 49, the internet is on track to equal, or perhaps surpass, television as the main source of national and international news within the next few years. Currently, 48% say the internet is their main source – up 16 points from 2007 – and 63% cite television – down eight points.

Read more at people-press.org

 

I will not stalk my ex on Facebook, and other social media resolutions

A friend of mine (who I met through social media) shared this post with me and I just had to add my two cents.

 

I’ll admit that I stoped dating a guy because he “stalked” my Facebook page, my Tweets and my blog posts. I’m sorry but it was just creepy and he got even creepier as the days rolled on. I’ll also admit that I “unfriended” an ex when he got married… NOT because he got married… but because he admitted he kept up with my whereabouts on Facebook (uh, no you don’t buddy… you’re married now… don’t you worry about what I’m doing). Yet, I’m not one of those people who checks up on someone else’s social sites. You would think with my type A personality and my need to be controlling that I would be all over their pages but it’s really not my style. In fact, my single girlfriends who are also “power users” have a rule: If we are seriously dating someone, you cannot be their friend on Facebook, allow them to follow you on Twitter and if it gets really deep, you might even want to block them from reading your blog posts.

 

Here’s the rub… what if they are already your “friend” or “follower” and THEN you start dating them? Ahhhhh, dating in 2011 just got interesting didn’t it? I’ll be blogging about that very soon but if we’re dating you’ll never get a chance to see that post now will you?

I need a certain amount of freedom to be me. I need to check in on Foursquare, write about my feelings and post content without censorship. So, while some folks need help NOT stalking other people, I need help making sure other people don’t cyber stalk me! That is all…

Amplify’d from thenextweb.com

On Christmas day 2009, my ex defriended me on Foursquare and stopped following me on Twitter.

Fair enough, I suppose. I didn’t need to know what bars he was going to and he didn’t need to read my 140-character self-deprecations. But I noticed his unfollow immediately and I cried, really hard. Three glasses of mulled cider later and I began to meditate on the aspects of sharing our lives, our work and our love online.

For all the other modern messes out there, here are 5 New Year’s social media related resolutions:

1. I will not stalk my ex on Facebook. There are so many different reasons why Facebook makes breaking up with people exponentially harder. First, if you were in an established Facebook relationship, the ensuing broken relationship will fill up your friends’ newsfeeds, dragging your already broken heart out into the virtual highway. Second, it means you have access to his or her life, even after you are no longer a part of it. If you don’t have enough willpower to avoid viewing your ex’s photos like a slideshow, then feel free to de-friend him or her. Just realize, that chances are they won’t ask for your friendship on Facebook ever again so it could make for an awkward digital reconciliation .

2. I will be more discerning with my friend requests. On Facebook, if your News Feed looks anything like mine these days, then you need to start being more discerning with your friend requests. Ask yourself 3 questions: Have I met this person in real life? Do we have mutual friends? Do I want this person to see photos of me and status updates for the rest of my Facebook using life? If no, then hit ignore or keep them on the wait list until you can answer yes to all three of those questions, otherwise known as Facebook purgatory.

On Foursquare, this is even more important. You can’t seriously want people you don’t even know to know where you are every time you check-in. That’s downright dangerous. I receive loads of Foursquare friend requests from people I don’t even know, most of the time its because they are new to the platform and haven’t realized Foursquare is more personal in nature than other platforms. But some of the time, the requests are simply scary.

3. I will not “auto” anything on Twitter. Don’t auto-follow. Don’t auto-DM. Don’t auto-tweet. Don’t do anything that shortcuts the already less-than-personal nature of social media. Nobody likes being on the receiving end of auto-generated messages, so don’t be the person to send them. In other words, be a human.

4. I will not spam my “friends” asking them to “Like me.” So you’re an artist, a fashion designer, or a musician, or you just think you’re going to be famous because you live in L.A. and you can breathe properly. Don’t badger your entire network asking them to “Like” you. If you’re really trying to get your message out there and gain notoriety ask your Mom, Dad, your roommate, a couple close friends, your boss and your significant other, but then stop there. More importantly, do something worth notoriety. If its truly notable, people will notice. It’s already a shallow effort and chances are you’ll piss off quite a few people who would’ve “Liked you” on their own without having you request their approval. Lastly, you’re devaluing the entire “Like” process by guilting your friends into adding one more “Like” to their Facebook page.

5. I will forget about MySpace. MySpace had its day, along with Ace of Base, white washed jeans and JNCOs. There are much better ways to waste your time on the Internet.

Read more at thenextweb.com

 

Get Social, or Get Left Behind

Kleiner Perkins Caulfield & Byers, the top Silicon Valley VC firm created a new $250 million fund to invest in social applications and services — which mega-investor John Doerr calls the “third wave” of Internet disruption.

Bing Gordon, the former Electronic Arts creative director who is now a KPCB partner, will run the fund. Companies today, he said, need to have a social sensibility at their core. Those that see social as something to be slapped on afterwards will get left behind.

I love my job more and more everyday!!!

Amplify’d from www.fastcompany.com

For many companies, social media is something the marketing department uses to increase their reach. Features like Facebook Connect seem like obligatory add-ons. But part of the company’s core offering? Not so much.

That’s about to change. So says Silicon Valley mega-investor John Doerr, of Kleiner Perkins Caulfield & Byers, who today announced a $250 million fund to invest in social applications and services. Companies like Cafebots, a startup Kleiner Perkins invested in earlier this year that helps people manage their online social relationships.

Also investing in the new “sFund” are Amazon, Facebook, and Zynga, whose CEOs appeared with Doerr at an event on the Facebook campus. The three other backers are Comcast, Liberty Media, and Allen & Company. The fund kicks off today and has not made any investments yet.

Doerr said KPCB was motivated to create the fund because it believes there’s a “third wave” of “incredible and disruptive innovation” that is fundamentally changing the nature of the Web right now. The first was the creation of the Internet itself, and the second was the invention of browsers, which made it possible for everyday people to use the Web. Now, Doerr said, the Web is shifting “from an old Internet of documents and sites to a new one that’s all about people and places and relationships.” The sFund’s goal, Doerr said, is not only to invest in companies that are leading the charge into the new era, but also to inspire young entrepreneurs to take the plunge.

Kleiner Perkins, one of Sand Hill Road’s leading venture capital firms, has a history of picking winners like Google, Amazon, and Sun Microsystems, as well as Electronic Arts, Symantec, and Netscape. In 2008, Kleiner Perkins created the $100 million iFund to invest in developers making applications, services, and components for the iPhone and iPad. One of those companies, game developer Ngmoco, just got bought by Japanese mobile gaming giant DeNA Co. for $400 million.

So when Kleiner Perkins–or, in this case, Mark Zuckerberg of sFund partner Facebook–says “every industry is going to get fundamentally rethought and designed around people,” it might be worth taking a listen.

Read more at www.fastcompany.com

Showcasing The Urban Heartbeat Using Geo-Based Tech

For all you who said “I’m not sure I want everyone to know where I am”, but now “check-in” religiously and for those of us on a race to collect badges and titles, SpotRank in Action is doing some interesting things in with geo-location technology that you might want to check out. Yeah, I know, “you’d NEVER want anyone to have THIS much information on you” right. After that wears off… I’ll “see” you online1

Amplify’d from www.npr.org

You are here.

And so are a million other people, except, now, there’s a way to get real-time information about them.

Using anonymous location-based data compiled from tens of millions of devices, companies like SpotRank create data maps, opening an entirely new window into where those humans are.

Marshall Kirkpatrick in his related article on Read, Write, Web sums the service up like this:

Imagine being able to look blocks or miles away from where you are and see how many people are hanging out at an intersection — in real time. Add a layer of precisely located Twitter messages, Foursquare check-ins, Flickr photos and other social data and what have you got?

See more at www.npr.org

Apple iTunes 10 and Ping: Problems… and then some…

OK Steve Jobs, you can’t have this world-wide press event, open it to the public, get us all jazzed about the new Apple offerings then have the new apps crash on us, have your new music social networking site… well… not be very social… and then have new features cause more harm than good.

I’m ready, let the Apple bashing begin (I still have your back Jobs.. but let’s work out some of these issues in the testing phase before it’s rolled out to the world… I’m just saying…)

Amplify’d from reviews.cnet.com

With any program being updated, there will be a few quirks at first while the new features get used in various people’s setups and configurations. The same goes for iTunes 10, where people are finding a few oddities that seem to be feature changes or bugs that need to be ironed out.

iPhone 4 apps causing crashes
Some people have been experiencing crashes in iTunes 10 when connecting theiriPhone 4 devices and selecting applications to transfer. If this happens, try resetting the iPhone and also try removing iTunes’ preferences (called com.apple.iTunes.plist and stored in the /username/Library/Preferences/ folder). You can also try launching iTunes in Safe Mode by holding the Option-Command keys when launching iTunes.

Album lists no longer resize
Album artwork resizing in list views is no longer possible. The only way to have resizable artwork is to use the sidebar’s album viewer window and then optionally click the artwork to open it in a dedicated window.

Removing “Ping”
Though social networking is a popular Internet development that companies are eager to take advantage of, it is not for all of us and many people prefer to avoid it. You have the option to ignore Ping in the sidebar, and you can also remove it by disabling the iTunes Store (provided you do not purchase items through the Store).

To do this, go to the iTunes preferences and in the “Parental” section select “Disable iTunes Store.”

AirPlay not working
A few people have reported the iTunes AirPlay feature is not working as it did in older versions of iTunes. For some their AirPort Express devices are selectable but no sound seems to be coming out of the unit.

If this happens, try setting the master volume in iTunes to its highest level, and do the same for your various wireless AirPort devices in iTunes. This can be done in the “Multiple Speakers” window (available from the “Window” menu). If your AirPort Express devices do not show up in iTunes, try unplugging them and shutting down your computer for a few minutes, then plug them in and start everything back up. Sometimes a quick reset like this is the easiest way to force-detect items and have them show up again.

“Nathan Volker” being followed in Ping
A few people have found the name “Nathan Volker” to be in their Ping profiles, and have wondered what is going on. Apparently this person created an account with the name “Steve Jobs” and then changed the name, resulting in some odd behavior. The account has been removed by Apple and should not affect anything. You should be able to stop following this account in Ping if you see it appear.

Read more at reviews.cnet.com

To Win Over Users, Gadgets Have to Be Touchable and it’s Only Natural

New science shows that technology that mimics what we do naturally and plays to our senses, like that of touching, will win us over in the user experience. Some are predicting that” the next generation of screens might not even need a touch. Instead, they will understand the gestures of people standing in front of them and pick up on eye movement and speech”. Are the users setting the trends for technology or the other way around?

Amplify’d from www.nytimes.com

Whoever said technology was dehumanizing was wrong. On screens everywhere — cellphones, e-readers, A.T.M.’s — as Diana Ross sang, we just want to reach out and touch.

Sony

The Sony Reader Touch Edition, to be introduced Wednesday. Researchers say people take naturally to touch screens.

Scientists and academics who study how we interact with technology say people often try to import those behaviors into their lives, as anyone who has ever wished they could lower the volume on a loud conversation or Google their brain for an answer knows well. But they say touching screens has seeped into people’s day-to-day existence more quickly and completely than other technological behaviors because it is so natural, intimate and intuitive.

And so device makers in a post-iPhone world are focused on fingertips, with touch at the core of the newest wave of computer design, known as natural user interface. Unlike past interfaces centered on the keyboard and mouse, natural user interface uses ingrained human movements that do not have to be learned.

“It’s part of the general trajectory we’re on in the computing industry — this whole notion of making computers more open to natural human gestures and intentions,” said Eric Horvitz, distinguished scientist at Microsoft Research.

The latest is a new line of Sony e-readers that the company will introduce Wednesday. For the first time, all have touch screens; Sony decided on the technology after watching person after person in focus groups automatically swipe the screen of its older, nontouch e-readers.

Research in Motion now makes touch-screen BlackBerrys, Amazon.com is expected to make a Kindle with a nonglare touch screen, and Garmin has introduced touch-screen GPS devices for biking, hiking and driving. New Canon and Panasonic digital cameras have touch screens and Diebold, which makes A.T.M.’s, says that more than half the machines that banks order today have touch screens.

Brides-to-be can scroll through bridesmaid dresses on a Hewlett-Packard touch-screen computer at Priscilla of Boston bridal boutiques, and a liquor store in Houston uses the H.P. screen as a virtual bartender, giving customers instructions for mixing drinks. The screens also show up on exercise machines, in hospitals, at airport check-in terminals and on Virgin America airplanes.

“Everyone who touches or takes a reader in their hand, they touch the screen,” said Steve Haber, president of Sony’s digital reading division. “It’s what we do.”

Read more at www.nytimes.com

The Privacy Issue Is Still Going Strong

Some say the way privacy is encoded into software doesn’t match the way we handle it in real life. If this is truw, what’s being done about it? Who will be our champion to protect our privacy?

Amplify’d from www.technologyreview.com

Each time Facebook’s privacy settings change or a technology makes personal information available to new audiences, people scream foul. Each time, their cries seem to fall on deaf ears.

Credit: Nick Reddyhoff

The reason for this disconnect is that in a computational world, privacy is often implemented through access control. Yet privacy is not simply about controlling access. It’s about understanding a social context, having a sense of how our information is passed around by others, and sharing accordingly. As social media mature, we must rethink how we encode privacy into our systems.

Privacy is not in opposition to speaking in public. We speak privately in public all the time. Sitting in a restaurant, we have intimate conversations knowing that the waitress may overhear. We count on what Erving Goffman called “civil inattention”: people will politely ignore us, and even if they listen they won’t join in, because doing so violates social norms. Of course, if a close friend sits at the neighboring table, everything changes. Whether an environment is public or not is beside the point. It’s the situation that matters.

Whenever we speak in face-to-face settings, we modify our communication on the basis of cues like who’s present and how far our voices carry. We negotiate privacy explicitly–“Please don’t tell anyone”–or through tacit understanding. Sometimes, this fails. A friend might gossip behind our back or fail to understand what we thought was implied. Such incidents make us question our interpretation of the situation or the trustworthiness of the friend.

All this also applies online, but with additional complications. Digital walls do almost have ears; they listen, record, and share our messages. Before we can communicate appropriately in a social environment like Facebook or Twitter, we must develop a sense for how and what people share.

When the privacy options available to us change, we are more likely to question the system than to alter our own behavior. But such changes strain our relationships and undermine our ability to navigate broad social norms. People who can be whoever they want, wherever they want, are a privileged minority.

As social media become more embedded in everyday society, the mismatch between the rule-based privacy that software offers and the subtler, intuitive ways that humans understand the concept will increasingly cause cultural collisions and social slips. But people will not abandon social media, nor will privacy disappear. They will simply work harder to carve out a space for privacy as they understand it and to maintain control, whether by using pseudonyms or speaking in code.

Read more at www.technologyreview.com

The Privacy Issue Is Still Going Strong

Some say the way privacy is encoded into software doesn’t match the way we handle it in real life. Yet, what’s being done about this? How will be our champion to protect our privacy?

Amplify’d from www.technologyreview.com

Each time Facebook’s privacy settings change or a technology makes personal information available to new audiences, people scream foul. Each time, their cries seem to fall on deaf ears.

Credit: Nick Reddyhoff

The reason for this disconnect is that in a computational world, privacy is often implemented through access control. Yet privacy is not simply about controlling access. It’s about understanding a social context, having a sense of how our information is passed around by others, and sharing accordingly. As social media mature, we must rethink how we encode privacy into our systems.

Privacy is not in opposition to speaking in public. We speak privately in public all the time. Sitting in a restaurant, we have intimate conversations knowing that the waitress may overhear. We count on what Erving Goffman called “civil inattention”: people will politely ignore us, and even if they listen they won’t join in, because doing so violates social norms. Of course, if a close friend sits at the neighboring table, everything changes. Whether an environment is public or not is beside the point. It’s the situation that matters.

Whenever we speak in face-to-face settings, we modify our communication on the basis of cues like who’s present and how far our voices carry. We negotiate privacy explicitly–“Please don’t tell anyone”–or through tacit understanding. Sometimes, this fails. A friend might gossip behind our back or fail to understand what we thought was implied. Such incidents make us question our interpretation of the situation or the trustworthiness of the friend.

All this also applies online, but with additional complications. Digital walls do almost have ears; they listen, record, and share our messages. Before we can communicate appropriately in a social environment like Facebook or Twitter, we must develop a sense for how and what people share.

When the privacy options available to us change, we are more likely to question the system than to alter our own behavior. But such changes strain our relationships and undermine our ability to navigate broad social norms. People who can be whoever they want, wherever they want, are a privileged minority.

As social media become more embedded in everyday society, the mismatch between the rule-based privacy that software offers and the subtler, intuitive ways that humans understand the concept will increasingly cause cultural collisions and social slips. But people will not abandon social media, nor will privacy disappear. They will simply work harder to carve out a space for privacy as they understand it and to maintain control, whether by using pseudonyms or speaking in code.

Read more at www.technologyreview.com

 

Google Agonizes on Privacy as Ad World Vaults Ahead

From “net neutrality” to a Google “vision statement” that questions the ethics of the mega company. Next step… you know what I’m about to say right… world domination!

Amplify’d from www.wallstreetjournal.com

A confidential, seven-page Google Inc. “vision statement” shows the information-age giant in a deep round of soul-searching over a basic question: How far should it go in profiting from its crown jewels—the vast trove of data it possesses about people’s activities?

Jessica Vascellaro talks to Simon Constable about the big privacy issue facing Google — how far should it go in profiting from its crown jewels-the vast trove of data it possesses about people’s activities? Plus, is Mark Hurd a good fit for Nokia.

Should it tap more of what it knows about Gmail users? Should it build a vast “trading platform” for buying and selling Web data? Should it let people pay to not see any ads at all?

These and other ideas big and small—the third one was listed under “wacky”—are discussed in the document, which was reviewed by The Wall Street Journal and compiled in late 2008 by Aitan Weinberg, now a senior product manager for interest-based advertising. Along with interviews with more than a dozen current and former employees, the vision statement offers a candid, introspective look at Google’s fight to remain at the vanguard of the information economy.

Google: Into the Future

Read excerpts from Google’s internal planning document.

Read more at www.wallstreetjournal.com

 

Foursquare Positioned To Partner With Google, Yahoo, Bing And Other Search Players

Well, now… this is getting interesting. Seems like the guys from foursquare have found a way to make expand on their business model. By the way, last week, Foursquare reported it had registered over 2 million users for 5.6 million venues on the platform, and around 1 million daily check-ins. The company is valued at around $100 million. So now I wonder, what’s in if for ME to continue to check in? Things that make you go… hmmmm

Foursquare, the location-based social media site, is aware of the value of its data for searches and has started talking to “a lot of different potential partners,” including industry majors such as Google, Yahoo and Microsoft in order to clinch data deals.

Foursquare.JPG

Data Power
Speaking to The Telegraph in an interview, Foursquare’s co-founder, Dennis Crowley, said: “Our data generates hugely interesting trends which would enrich search.” “We can anonymise data and use it to show venues which are trending at that moment,” he explained.
In Talks

“Twitter helped the world and the search engines know what people are talking about. Foursquare would allow people to search for the types of place people are going to – and where is trending – not what,” Crowley added. Recently, the company integrated its data to Twitter ‘Places’, giving the chirpy platform its ticket to paid search.

‘Historical’ Ties
Crowley himself has ties with Google, to whom he sold Foursquare’s text-message version called Dodgeball back in 2005. The Telegraph further quoted him as saying that he now employs “former Googlers.” However, none of the search engines commented on the state of the Foursquare partnership talks.

Ironically, Yahoo had expressed interest in the company in April. But not for teaming up with Foursquare. The intention of the search engine now turned content provider was to buy Foursquare. Now with the Search Alliance integrating Yahoo Search into Bing, who knows if Foursquare will not be dealing with both – one as a content partner and the other as search engine?

Read more at blog.searchenginewatch.com

@GeoffLivingston Mashable article on how non-profits can use @foursquare

I used Foursquare to drive traffic to our VISTA (Volunteers In Service To America) Coffeehouse each day of the National Conference on Volunteering in Service Conference in New York last month. I like the ideas in this article for even more robust and strategic usage of Foursquare for non-profits.

Amplify’d from mashable.com

Foursquare (Foursquare) isn’t just a good place to find cheap Mocha-Frappuccino’s. The social media tool is quickly allowing for new ways to benefit a range of fields, including non-profit organizations.

There have been several articles on how non-profits are using Foursquare, but I wanted to find out how his location-based social network can help non-profits, so I chatted with experts about how non-profits can maximize their Foursquare accounts.

“Non-profits are about awareness, they want to get as many people to understand what they are doing,” Foursquare Co-Founder Naveen Selvaduari said. “Foursquare is a great platform for that, and bringing people together, and make it easier together for them to understand.”


The Standard Stuff


taft image

Having a location-based non-profit will obviously help you get the most out of a Foursquare account. Make sure you claim your location and then create specials that appeal to your audience.

“Location based non-profits have an easier road, since they can offer specials and other incentives on Foursquare,” said Chris Thompson, author of the About Foursquare blog. “In Cincinnati, the Taft Museum of Art uses Foursquare as a loyalty program, offering increasing rewards as guests return again and again. The fifth check-in gets a free dessert, the 10th earns a free membership and the 15th gets a free poster or museum guidebook. It’s a great, easy way for the Taft to increase repeat visits.”

Your account can also help you find and mobilize a base of willing volunteers and donors. “There are also other organizations like hospitals and small advocacy groups who can leverage Foursquare,” said Allyson Kapin, founder of Women Who Tech and editor of Care2’s Frogloop blog. “…Big Love Little Hearts, an organization which helps children in developing countries with heart defects, raised $25K in just 24 hours by getting a donor to contribute $1 when someone checked in or tweeted using the hashtag #100by100. The money raised was enough to pay for 12 heart surgeries.”


Leverage the API


brooklyn image

Perhaps one Foursquare’s greatest assets is its unique, open API. Developers can be deployed to create new ways to check-in, allow data mining and unique application creation to visualize foot-traffic at a location.

“Using our API, anyone can go in create a unique effort,” said Foursquare’s Selvadurai. “Shelley Bernstein from the Brooklyn Museum pulled data from the API to highlight the people that come to the museum and started keeping track of all the mayors. The museum announces the new mayor when it changes. They host special mayor parties, and have turned it into an event, a token ceremony.”

Read more at mashable.com