Digital Media News: Closing Out The Week With Five Things To Know

Ripped from the headlines, here are five things you should know this week for your digital and social media professional development.

Copyblogger: The Savvy Marketer’s Checklist for Seductive Landing Pages – Ever wonder what you could do to stop people from bouncing off your landing pages? You work hard to polish your sales copy. You’ve even recorded a snazzy demonstration video. But when you check your site’s analytics? You feel soooo frustrated. And the worst thing is … you don’t know what else you can do. How can you improve your conversion rates? Use the 40 tips in our landing page checklist to see where you’ve gone wrong. Or, use the checklist to create a landing page from scratch. See your email list grow faster, your webinars sell out, and your product sales go through the roof.

Here's What's NewRe/code: Twitter vs. Meerkat – Meerkat, the undisputed belle of the 2015 SXSW ball, was hobbled by Twitter’s mid-festival announcement of its acquisition of rival Periscope. The social video-sharing app had achieved a healthy dose of buzz for its savvy integration with the Twitter platform. Yet within hours of the news of its Periscope acquisition, Twitter fired the torpedoes: Informing its upstart rival that it would no longer have access to Twitter’s social graphing capabilities, which allowed Meerkat users to automatically push their livestreams out to their Twitter followers without building a separate contact list in the Meerkat app. Platform owner has significant power. Startup building on that platform is vulnerable. Platform owner capitalizes on its clout and attempts to move in for the kill. Sound familiar? It’s the hypothetical worst-case scenario so often cited by proponents of Title II net neutrality regulations — proponents including Twitter itself. [ED NOTE: This is the one to watch]

POLITICO: The Mobile Election – How smartphones will change the 2016 presidential race -As Hillary Clinton prepares for the formal launch of her campaign, and as Jeb Bush and Scott Walker are neck and neck in the polls, roughly two out of every three American adults, or 64 percent, own a smartphone, according to a new report from Pew. On the consumption side, the rise in mobile will “change politics the same way it is changing American life broadly,” said Ben Smith, the editor-in-chief of BuzzFeed. “People will organize and persuade on mobile devices and apps, the same way they live on them more broadly. Though mobile usage is highest among younger Americans, news consumption is “common even among older smartphone owners,” as “four-in-ten smartphone owners ages 65 and older use their phone at least occasionally to keep up with breaking news.” On the media side, the rise in mobile usage will increase the number of citizen reporters, whose influence on recent political campaigns has been quite significant. Video footage of an errant remark — from George Allen’s “Macaca” moment in 2006 to Mitt Romney’s “47 percent” moment in 2012 — can have more influence on a political campaign than any traditional news report.

Forbes: The Rise Of The Female CDO – The Chief Digital Officer is one role where women are outpacing men by two to one, according to a FierceCIO article citing research by Gartner , which also notes that the number of CDOs who are women has been growing dramatically every year. There are certainly some prominent examples, including Rachel Haot, CDO for New York State (and previously the City of New York), who was chosen Chief Digital Officer of the Year in 2014 by the CDO Club. Others include Jessica Federer at Bayer , Linda Avery of the Federal Reserve and Julie Bornstein, who holds the positions of both CMO and CDO of Sephora . [ED NOTE: Yay! That is all.]

1Harvard Business Review: Defining Strategy, Implementation, and Execution – It is striking how much confusion there is between strategy, implementation, and execution. Is “strategy” a matter of making choices about where we want to go, where we play and how we win, of setting goals and actions, about how we create and capture economic value over time? Is “getting things done” what we mean by implementation or execution? Do you “execute” or “implement” a strategy? And can you separate these from strategy formation? For strategy wonks like me, thinking about the definitions of these ideas provides endless fascination. For many business leaders, however, I find that the semantics matter a lot less. And that’s too bad because the semantics should matter. There are meaningful distinctions between strategy, implementation, and execution that are helpful to running a company or business in the real world. Ignoring, blurring, or getting them wrong creates sloppy thinking, deciding, and doing at all levels of an organization. Let’s start with strategy.

The Broadband Space and Why You Should Care!

It’s hard to imagine a debate that might bore more people to tears than the one the governmental policies over airwave spectrum but it’s a hot topic and one that may ultimately impact you pocketbook. Here’s why…

Amplify’d from www.usatoday.com

Everyone’s starting to realize that the 547 megahertz of spectrum that can be used for mobile broadband isn’t enough to accommodate the burgeoning number of consumers and businesses falling in love with smartphones, tablet computers such as Apple’s iPad, and other wireless communications devices.

“If we don’t act, the (wireless) consumer experience will be very frustrating,” Federal Communications Commission Chairman Julius Genachowski said in an interview. “The congestion will be very significant.”

That means more dropped calls, slower transmission speeds, dead zones — and potentially high prices, with the heaviest mobile service users paying the most.

AT&T said this week that it agreed to pay $39 billion for T-Mobile to avoid getting caught in a spectrum crunch.

And you’ll probably hear a lot more about airwave policy as the federal government prepares to coax some spectrum from one of the most potent forces in politics: television broadcasters. They collectively control some of the biggest blocks of airwaves but don’t want to lose their ability to transmit video over the air and for free.

“This spectrum crunch exists in a few major metropolitan areas,” says National Association of Broadcasters CEO Gordon Smith. “It exists in Los Angeles, and it exists in New York. For someone living in Las Vegas or Kentucky, why should their over-the-air television service be obstructed so you can get a faster download of an app in New York City?”

The debate is intensifying, though, because demand for wireless broadband is soaring faster than you can download a movie from Netflix or stream music from Pandora. It will be 60 times greater in 2015 than it was in 2009, Cisco Systems projects.

“We have seen over the last four years, on our network alone, mobile broadband traffic has increased by 8,000%,” AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson said this week. The company expects that demand to grow as much as 1,000% over the next five years, he adds.

A lot of that is because of the growing sophistication of mobile devices. A conventional wireless feature phone might only make it possible to play games or listen to music, in addition to handling voice calls and text messages. A smartphone, though, also enables users to watch videos and listen to turn-by-turn driving directions.

The result: A smartphone typically uses 24 times as much spectrum capacity as a regular cellphone. Nearly 66 million people own smartphones now, and that’s growing fast, research firm ComScore reports.

And tablets — which provide many of the same features of a smartphone but on a much bigger screen — can use 122 times more spectrum capacity as an ordinary cellphone. More than 82 million people will have a tablet in 2015, up from 10.3 million last year, Forrester Research projects.

“It would be nice if we had a warehouse of spectrum that wasn’t being used that we could put on the market to meet this demand,” Genachowski says. “But we don’t.”

Wireless broadband goals

Still, President Obama pledged in his State of the Union Address in January to do what’s needed to help the country take advantage of the revolution in mobile communications.

“Within the next five years,” Obama said, “we will make it possible for business to deploy the next generation of high-speed wireless coverage to 98% of all Americans.”

AT&T general counsel Wayne Watts told Wall Street analysts that the company’s proposed deal with T-Mobile would “help to achieve the president’s wireless broadband goal.” The company says that by combining its resources with T-Mobile’s, it could offer wireless high-speed Internet to an additional 46 million people.

It remains to be seen whether that argument will resonate at the FCC and Justice Department. The two agencies must decide whether the combination of AT&T and T-Mobile — reducing the number of major wireless carriers to three — would serve the public interest without making mobile services substantially less competitive.

In any case, the Obama administration is determined to redeploy spectrum. Last year, the president called on the FCC and the Commerce Department’s National Telecommunications and Information Administration to find 300 MHz over five years, and 500 MHz over the next decade, for mobile and fixed broadband services. That would be about 25 times the spectrum devoted to FM radio.

The agencies are studying how spectrum is being used to see where it can be reassigned. For example, some might come from frequencies controlled by the government or from implementing technologies that would enable current services to be handled in less airspace.

But the FCC hopes to kick-start its effort by securing 120 MHz from television stations. The agency wants some stations to voluntarily give up their spectrum in return for a share of the proceeds when the frequencies are auctioned.

The hope is that this deal would appeal to many marginal TV stations, including those that feature home shopping or religious programming.

They might lose only a few viewers if they become pay-TV services, the thinking goes: About 90% of viewers subscribe to cable or satellite TV, which offer local broadcast programming in addition to pay-TV channels such as CNN, USA and ESPN.

“It’s a win-win approach,” Genachowski says. “It frees up spectrum fast. … And it’s a win for broadcasters, who would get fair compensation for getting out of the business, or going to cable only, or sharing spectrum with another broadcaster in the market.”

Although two stations can co-exist on one channel, they might not both be able to offer the best high-definition signals or, potentially, 3-D TV.

Read more at www.usatoday.com

iPhone users are the most loyal smartphone owners

The smartphone war continues! Worldwide, it seems iPhone users are sticking with their Apple smartphone. For me, I love the Apple interface of the Mac Book Pro, iPhone, iPod(s) and iPad. I’m not so sure that I’m loyal to the product line as much as I want an seemless interaction between my most used devises and therefore I stick with Apple. Well, that and the fact that Apple offers great products. Either way, we’re winning customer loyalty… for now.

Amplify’d from www.mobile-ent.biz
iPhone users are the most loyal smartphone owners

59% say they’re sticking with iOS

New research from GfK claims that nearly six in ten iPhone owners plan to stay loyal to iOS – well ahead of rival smartphone operating systems.

35% of BlackBerry owners say they’ll stay loyal to RIM, while the results for Android, Symbian and Windows Mobile are 28%, 24% and 21% respectively.

The stats are important: they show how rapidly the smartphone market is changing. Symbian remains the most popular OS, but if 76% of those users are eyeing rival platforms, its share may slide fast in the next 12-18 months.

That said, Android’s low loyalty score is also surprising. Google is activating hundreds of thousands of devices a day, but it seems it has yet to engender Apple-level loyalty in its new users.

GfK’s research is based on an online survey of 2,653 mobile users in Brazil, Germany, Spain, the UK, the US and China.

Read more at www.mobile-ent.biz

Google Earth 3.1 Lets You Look UnderWater!

With the latest release of Google Earth 3.1 for iOS, you can now explore underwater landscapes and terrain on your iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch. By land or sea, Google Earth will take you there.

 

Looking for buried treasure? No problem, just use Google Earth. Want to know if your roof needs repair, just put in your home address (I’m not kidding, I saw a missing shingle thanks to Google Earth).

 

I kid about Google being in the world domination business but I don’t think I’m joking anymore. Gotta go, I’m using Google Earth to see what’s really going on under sea level at the Bermuda Triangle.

Amplify’d from googlemobile.blogspot.com
Dive below the ocean’s surface to explore underwater canyons, or travel to the ocean’s deepest point, the Mariana Trench. Once underwater, simply swipe the screen with two fingers to “look around.” You can always reset your view by clicking on the north arrow on the iPad, or on the compass on the iPhone and iPod.As with the desktop and other mobile versions of Google Earth, we’ve also added the “Ocean” layer, which features hundreds of photos and videos from more than 100 contributors curated by the Sylvia Earle Alliance.


This version also includes native support for the new Retina display, which means that if you have an iPhone 4 or the new iPod touch, you’ll get to enjoy an even sharper view of the world. 

Google Earth 3.2 for iPhone, iPad and iPod touch is available now in the App Store, or navigate to http://m.google.com/earth in your mobile browser. You can also download Google Earth by scanning this QR code:

For help or additional information, visit our help center.

Read more at googlemobile.blogspot.com

 

AOL buys it’s own geo-location mobile social service Rally Up

WOW! Remember when AOL was King? Now it seems they are just Tardy For The Party. In any event, their stocks rose (if only slightly) after they purchased the geo-location social networking site Rally Up. I’m already checking into five different places and starting to narrow it down to my top three. I, for one, will not Rally Up anywhere but good luck to AOL in it’s attempt to remain relevant.

Amplify’d from news.yahoo.com

Internet company AOL Inc. has purchased location-based social networking service Rally Up for an undisclosed sum.

New York-based AOL said Tuesday that Rally Up’s mobile applications will add to its consumer applications unit. The company will join AOL in its new office in Palo Alto, Calif. Rally Up will work with AOL’s vice president of mobile, David Temkin, on creating products that are first released as mobile applications, AOL said.

Rally Up started in 2009. It offers a social networking app by the same name for Apple Inc.’s iPhone and iPad, and has submitted another application to Apple’s App Store called FacePlant that is meant to let iPhone users see friends and start a video chat over the iPhone’s FaceTime app.

AOL shares rose 5 cents to finish regular trading at $22.22.

Read more at news.yahoo.com

CNN International event looking at rise of mobile journalism

I’m glad a respected, international, news agency is addressing the use of mobile journalists. I only wish I was in London so I could attend the conference. Hopefully, someone on the mobiel journalism side will live tweeting from this conference. Or, better yet, maybe someone will be live streaming from their smartphone.  Isn’t that what we’re talking about here?

Amplify’d from www.journalism.co.uk
Speakers at the Frontline Club, led by CNNi’s own vice-president of mobile Louis Gump, will debate the role of mobile phones in newsgathering and reporting, as well as offering practical advice for journalists on mobile technologies.
CNNi The rise of the “mobile journalist” will be the subject of a free event this Thursday (22 July) hosted by CNN International.

Recent developments, such as the launch of the iPhone 4 and a move towards broadcast quality video via mobile, will also be on the agenda.
The motivation of “citizen journalists” who share and submit news tips and material to organisations will also be considered during the evening, which is supported by Journalism.co.uk.

Read more at www.journalism.co.uk

 

CNN International event looking at rise of mobile journalism

I’m glad a respected, international, news agency is addressing the use of mobile journalists. I only wish I was in London so I could attend. Hopefully, someone on the mobile journalism side will live tweet from the conference. Or, better yet, maybe someone will be live streaming it from their smartphone.  This is, after all, what we’re attempting to address here, correct?

Amplify’d from www.journalism.co.uk
Speakers at the Frontline Club, led by CNNi’s own vice-president of mobile Louis Gump, will debate the role of mobile phones in newsgathering and reporting, as well as offering practical advice for journalists on mobile technologies.
CNNi
The rise of the “mobile journalist” will be the subject of a free event this Thursday (22 July) hosted by CNN International.
Recent developments, such as the launch of the iPhone 4 and a move towards broadcast quality video via mobile, will also be on the agenda.
The motivation of “citizen journalists” who share and submit news tips and material to organisations will also be considered during the evening, which is supported by Journalism.co.uk.

Read more at www.journalism.co.uk

Google Nexus One is Nexus Last while HTC heads towards dominating the space!

So, uh… should I be purchasing an HTC? First I fall in love with my Blackberry, then my iPhone. Question, how many darn smartphones does one Geek Diva need to stay relevant?

So last week in less than six weeks from its launch, Microsoft killed its two first phone models and the whole handset project known as Kin. And before we have had time to even digest and understand all the undertones of that bizarre end to a ‘strategy’ we now see another death in the smartphones space.

GOOGLE NEXUS ONE IS NEXUS LAST

The CEO of Google, Eric Schmidt announced earlier this week that there won’t be another Nexus. No Nexus Two. So their first attempt at making a ‘superphone’ (that was a silly term for it) ended a superdud. And rather than try to learn and make it better (something Apple managed tremendously well where its original iPhone 2 was not being accepted internationally), Google decides to end its line of superphones. This is no doubt welcome news to all the 30 or so manufacturers who are committed to the Android platform, to see that Google is not going to compete with them. That initial launch of Nexus One with its ‘proprietary’ gains to the OS, seemed very unfair at the time. But as we ponder how poorly Google managed its smartphones on the Android platform, consider HTC here next.

HTC SALES JUMP AND PROFITS TOO

HTC announces a monster Q2 quarter. Remember that RIM grew its sales by 6% from Q1, a very healthy growth rate (and in the previous quarter from Q4 to Q1, Nokia grew 3% and Apple was flat) – HTC is now so hot, it grew 36% from Q1 to Q2. They sold 4.5 million smartphones. I make it that about 30% of all Android phones sold globally today are made by HTC.Read more at communities-dominate.blogs.com