To Blog or Not to Blog?

Beblogabadge

Blogging has come a long way, hasn’t it?  I had to pinch myself when I was given a White House press credential to blog about President Obama’s address to the National Urban League.  More and more we are being taken seriously as journalist and just about every brand recognizes that you want bloggers in your corner.  But when I started my first blog I really just wanted a place to express myself.  Because I’m so expressive (read slightly schizophrenic), here I am years later with several blogs I manage (no, I am NOT going to tell you how many) that cover everything from spirituality, women’s issues, and social media trends to technology and dating.  I’ve never started blogging to make money, although I’ve been hired to cover some really cool gigs and somehow landed myself as a lifestyle blogger.  The question I get asked most often from people who want to start blogging is “what should I write about?” Here are some suggestions to get you started.

Blogging Tips:

  • Write about what makes your heart sing 
  • Write about something that you are passionate about
  • Be your most authentic self
  • Find a voice you haven’t heard and express your point of view
  • Promote your blog across multiple social media network
  • Let your personality shine
  • Benchmark blogs you like

Don’t have a lot of time to Blog?

  • Use mixed media in your blogs so you don’t have to write as much
  • Phone it in, audio blogging is a great way to get a quick post up
  • Blog from your smartphone or tablet
  • Keep it simple – each post doesn’t have to be the next great America novel

Once you get your blog off the ground do the things that truth be told, I need to do more of:

  • Post basis
  • Partner with guest bloggers who can keep your blog fresh and up to date
  • Update your blog’s theme when necessary
  • Blog on the go
  • Comment on blogs you like and you will slowly build a community
  • Find someone to proof your blog before posting (FYI, I need this BADLY… any volunteers… please… anyone?)

Need more inspiration?  Join me at BLOGALICIOUS 2011 October 21-23, 2011. As an official blogging ambassador for BLOGALICIOUS 2011 I will be joining some of the most influential and talented female bloggers and social media savvy women from all across the country.  If you’ve ever thought about starting a blog, making a career out of blogging or wondered how to get more traffic to your blog, this is the conference for you!  If you’re a well established blogger, come out and meet your fellow colleagues IRL to network, support each other, share best practices, uplift each other and just have a good time having fun.  Be sure to register today, tickets are going fast.  

Founded in 2009, the Blogalicious Weekend conferences are aimed at celebrating the diversity of women of all ethnicities in social media. Over the course of 3 event-filled days, savvy, influential and talented women bloggers will ignite a sense of unity within the multicultural blogging community as well as educate marketers on the importance of our demographic in today’s marketplace, all while networking, building relationships, and promoting inspiration and success for each other.

 

A Modest Proposal for the Future of Online Magazines

Can a daily online-only magazine featuring quality writing and journalism survive without losing money?

Amplify’d from gawker.com

A Modest Proposal for the Future of Online MagazinesFor well over a decade, Salon.com has tried to solve the puzzle of how to put out a daily online-only magazine featuring quality writing and journalism without losing money. They’ve failed. We have just one decent idea for their survival.

Daily journalism—even Salon’s version, with a handful of superstar writers, a small stable of workhorses, and a bunch of freelancers—is expensive. The most comparable operation is Slate, which is nestled sweetly in the sheltering bosom of the Washington Post Company. This is what Salon itself now hopes to find: a large media company patron that will pick up Salon, cover its losses, and let it continue to operate, figuring that its prestige and opportunities for synergy are worth the (relatively small, by big media company standards) red ink it accumulates on a yearly basis.

It’s fair, now, to say that this particular format simply isn’t profitable. No amount of better content would make this particular format profitable. To become profitable in its current format, Salon would have to slash expenses to the point that their quality would suffer severely. Online ad money—even supplemented with subscriptions, which Salon’s tried—just won’t support the level of staff and expense necessary to produce that kind of content on an independent site. (Sorry, all you other startups who had the same idea!)

Gawker Media is a lean, mean stable of diversified blogs that can cross-sell. The Huffington Post is a bare-bones operation that takes much of its content wholesale from other news organizations, and gets another chunk donated for free by aspiring writers. Politico has print ads to bring in cash. Drudge, Perez Hilton, and other successful blogs are tiny operations with nowhere near the staff expenses of Salon. Media models that have proven to be profitable online tend to be cheap, or to have alternate revenue streams to supplement them. For Salon, and others who bring a print-style cost structure to an internet-style ad revenue stream, disappointment is almost inevitable.

And the dream of simply being scooped up by a bigger media company isn’t a sound one. Sure, it still might happen, but for how long? Big media companies have their own problems—namely, that many of their traditional properties are losing revenue to online interlopers. Like Salon! Even Slate’s parent company makes its money off test prep services, not off its namesake newspaper. Big tech companies like Yahoo that want to get into the content business are a better bet in the near term for journalism operations looking to find a new home, but they, too, will inevitably want those content businesses to prove profitable eventually; there is no free lunch at public companies. Only at Conde Nast.

Read more at gawker.com

Huffington Post well on it’s way to becoming an Internet Newspaper

At a time when traditional newspapers and publishing as a whole are facing some of their most challenging times, the Huffington Post has found a way to remain relevant. Positioning themselves as an “Internet Newspaper” is a brilliant idea in my book or rather… iBook.

Amplify’d from www.thewrap.com

Last summer, when the Huffington Post was prepping the launches of its sports, tech and books sections, Arianna Huffington told me – and anyone who would listen – that her goal for HuffPo all along had been to create an Internet newspaper.

“We always knew that with our core values of news and opinion and community, we wanted to cover more than just politics,” Huffington said. “We needed to speak to more than that, to move like an Internet newspaper.”

On Wednesday, Huffington inched even closer, launching a travel section.

The section, HuffPost Travel, will be edited by Kate Auletta, the daughter of New Yorker writer and author Ken Auletta and former assistant features editor at “WSJ.” – the Wall Street Journal’s luxury magazine.

Read more at www.thewrap.com

CNN International event looking at rise of mobile journalism

I’m glad a respected, international, news agency is addressing the use of mobile journalists. I only wish I was in London so I could attend the conference. Hopefully, someone on the mobiel journalism side will live tweeting from this conference. Or, better yet, maybe someone will be live streaming from their smartphone.  Isn’t that what we’re talking about here?

Amplify’d from www.journalism.co.uk
Speakers at the Frontline Club, led by CNNi’s own vice-president of mobile Louis Gump, will debate the role of mobile phones in newsgathering and reporting, as well as offering practical advice for journalists on mobile technologies.
CNNi The rise of the “mobile journalist” will be the subject of a free event this Thursday (22 July) hosted by CNN International.

Recent developments, such as the launch of the iPhone 4 and a move towards broadcast quality video via mobile, will also be on the agenda.
The motivation of “citizen journalists” who share and submit news tips and material to organisations will also be considered during the evening, which is supported by Journalism.co.uk.

Read more at www.journalism.co.uk

 

CNN International event looking at rise of mobile journalism

I’m glad a respected, international, news agency is addressing the use of mobile journalists. I only wish I was in London so I could attend. Hopefully, someone on the mobile journalism side will live tweet from the conference. Or, better yet, maybe someone will be live streaming it from their smartphone.  This is, after all, what we’re attempting to address here, correct?

Amplify’d from www.journalism.co.uk
Speakers at the Frontline Club, led by CNNi’s own vice-president of mobile Louis Gump, will debate the role of mobile phones in newsgathering and reporting, as well as offering practical advice for journalists on mobile technologies.
CNNi
The rise of the “mobile journalist” will be the subject of a free event this Thursday (22 July) hosted by CNN International.
Recent developments, such as the launch of the iPhone 4 and a move towards broadcast quality video via mobile, will also be on the agenda.
The motivation of “citizen journalists” who share and submit news tips and material to organisations will also be considered during the evening, which is supported by Journalism.co.uk.

Read more at www.journalism.co.uk