Huffpo Bloggers: Do You Feel Exploited?

A team of researchers from U.C. Santa Barbara’s Carsey-Wolf Center are polling Huffpo bloggers to see how they feel about their free labor. Answer options for that last question include “Bloggers should form a union,” “Bloggers should withhold their labor” and “Bloggers should launch a publicity campaign.” Yes, yes and yes but let’s not hold our breath waiting for it to happen!

Amplify’d from blogs.forbes.com
DALLAS, TX - FEBRUARY 05:  (FILE PHOTO) Co-fou...

Is she running a platform or a plantation? That’s for her bloggers to say. Image by Getty Images for AOL via @daylife

The Newspaper Guild says the Huffington Post is taking advantage of its unpaid bloggers. Huffpo says its bloggers are only too happy to write for free. What do the bloggers themselves say? With a few exceptions, we haven’t heard much from them.

A team of researchers from U.C. Santa Barbara’s Carsey-Wolf Center aims to change that. The researchers are polling Huffpo bloggers under the aegis of the Media Industries Project, which studies trends in media culture with a focus on digital media, globalization and creative labor.

“We have been planning this survey from the time we heard about the merger,” says Ryan Fuller, a doctoral candidate working on the study, via email. “The merger provides an opportunity to focus on the conditions of digital labor (e.g., bloggers), and who is responsible for value creation (contributors v. distributors) in the digital environment.”

The survey is being conducted independently, without cooperation by Huffpo or AOL. Since researchers had to track down subjects’ email addresses themselves, only a fraction of Huffpo’s 9,000 bloggers are being polled. The questions being asked include:

-Do you feel you should receive part of the $315 million AOL used to purchase the Huffington Post?

-Do you feel that the Huffington Post’s brand has changed since the merger with AOL?

-How would you compare the conditions at the Huffington Post to other sites you have blogged for?

-Some have raised concerns about the labor arrangement bloggers have with The Huffington Post. In your opinion, what do you think is the best way for bloggers to address the issue of compensation for digital labor?

Answer options for that last question include “Bloggers should form a union,” “Bloggers should withhold their labor” and “Bloggers should launch a publicity campaign.”

Fuller says results from the survey will be published in April.

Read more at blogs.forbes.com

 

The Huffington Post is profitable, although just barely.

According to Newsweek, in an engaging profile of Arianna Huffington, the popular and expanding Huffington Post generates little more than $1 per reader each year. So while it is clearly the winner among Internet media companies a new business model may be in order.

Amplify’d from www.newsweek.com

Charles Ommanney / Getty Images for Newsweek

Arianna Huffington at her home in July.

If you had to declare a winner among Internet media companies today, the victor easily would be Arianna Huffington. Her site, The Huffington Post, attracted 24.3 million unique visitors last month, five times as much traffic as many new-media rivals, more than The Washington Post and USA Today, and nearly as many as The New York Times. HuffPo’s revenue this year will be about $30 -million—peanuts compared with the old-media dinosaurs, but way better than most digital competitors. And HuffPo has finally started to eke out a profit.

Those numbers, however, don’t fully convey the site’s place in this new-media world. What began five years ago as a spot for Huffington and her lefty celebrity friends to vent about the Bush administration has become one of the most important news sites on the Web, covering politics, sports, entertainment, business—along with plenty of tabloidy stuff to drive clicks, like photos of “Jennifer Aniston’s topless perfume ad.” HuffPo’s mission, Huffington says, is “to provide a platform for a really important national conversation.”

Read more at www.newsweek.com

The Huffington Post is profitable, although just barely.

According to Newsweek, in an engaging profile of Arianna Huffington, the popular and expanding Huffington Post generates little more than $1 per reader each year. So while it is clearly the winner among Internet media companies a new business model may be in order.

Amplify’d from www.newsweek.com

If you had to declare a winner among Internet media companies today, the victor easily would be Arianna Huffington. Her site, The Huffington Post, attracted 24.3 million unique visitors last month, five times as much traffic as many new-media rivals, more than The Washington Post and USA Today, and nearly as many as The New York Times. HuffPo’s revenue this year will be about $30 -million—peanuts compared with the old-media dinosaurs, but way better than most digital competitors. And HuffPo has finally started to eke out a profit.

Those numbers, however, don’t fully convey the site’s place in this new-media world. What began five years ago as a spot for Huffington and her lefty celebrity friends to vent about the Bush administration has become one of the most important news sites on the Web, covering politics, sports, entertainment, business—along with plenty of tabloidy stuff to drive clicks, like photos of “Jennifer Aniston’s topless perfume ad.” HuffPo’s mission, Huffington says, is “to provide a platform for a really important national conversation.”

Read more at www.newsweek.com

Huffington Post well on it’s way to becoming an Internet Newspaper

At a time when traditional newspapers and publishing as a whole are facing some of their most challenging times, the Huffington Post has found a way to remain relevant. Positioning themselves as an “Internet Newspaper” is a brilliant idea in my book or rather… iBook.

Amplify’d from www.thewrap.com

Last summer, when the Huffington Post was prepping the launches of its sports, tech and books sections, Arianna Huffington told me – and anyone who would listen – that her goal for HuffPo all along had been to create an Internet newspaper.

“We always knew that with our core values of news and opinion and community, we wanted to cover more than just politics,” Huffington said. “We needed to speak to more than that, to move like an Internet newspaper.”

On Wednesday, Huffington inched even closer, launching a travel section.

The section, HuffPost Travel, will be edited by Kate Auletta, the daughter of New Yorker writer and author Ken Auletta and former assistant features editor at “WSJ.” – the Wall Street Journal’s luxury magazine.

Read more at www.thewrap.com

Arianna Huffington: We Can Finally Explain What Bloggers Are And Why They Should Get Paid

The Huffington Post… kicking butt and taking name but mostly… paying bloggers and understanding the value of paying us for our content. I think I’ll start following The Huffington Post on Twitter again 🙂

Amplify’d from www.businessinsider.com

Only five years after its launch, the Huffington Post is rivaling established news publications such as the New York Times in terms of popularity online, and it is on track to take over the world.

Co-founder and editor-in-chief Arianna Huffington says her publication’s path to glory has come along with its share of failures.

The biggest mistake of all, says Huffington, was confusing the public about the definition and role of the new media format — as known as blogging.

Watch Arianna discuss the difference between reporters and bloggers, why paying bloggers (once a controversial debate) is now acceptable (although HuffPo relies on contributions from many unpaid bloggers), and how public participation has changed over the last five years.

Read more at www.businessinsider.com