How Women Really Feel About Facebook Friends

“Daily deals site Eversave talked to 400 women about their Facebook relationships. The company originally conducted the survey as market research on the social network’s influence on the daily deals ecosystem, but Eversave was surprised to uncover the love/hate relationship between women and their online friends.

For example, the majority of female respondents said they had at least one friend who was a “drama queen” on Facebook. A majority also said they had at least one obnoxiously “proud mother” as a Facebook friend.

Most women — 83% of respondents in this survey — are annoyed at one time or another by the posts from their Facebook connections. For these respondents, the most off-putting post was some kind of whine; a full 63% said complaining from Facebook friends was their number one pet peeve, with political chatter and bragging coming in a distant second and third.

The respondents also said at least one of their Facebook friends tended to:

* Share too many mundane updates too often (65%)
* “Like” too many posts (46%)
* Inappropriately or too frequently use Facebook to promote causes (40%)
* Project false information or images of a perfect life (40%)

Read more from our friends a Mashable.com

Amplify’d from mashable.com

 

I will not stalk my ex on Facebook, and other social media resolutions

A friend of mine (who I met through social media) shared this post with me and I just had to add my two cents.

 

I’ll admit that I stoped dating a guy because he “stalked” my Facebook page, my Tweets and my blog posts. I’m sorry but it was just creepy and he got even creepier as the days rolled on. I’ll also admit that I “unfriended” an ex when he got married… NOT because he got married… but because he admitted he kept up with my whereabouts on Facebook (uh, no you don’t buddy… you’re married now… don’t you worry about what I’m doing). Yet, I’m not one of those people who checks up on someone else’s social sites. You would think with my type A personality and my need to be controlling that I would be all over their pages but it’s really not my style. In fact, my single girlfriends who are also “power users” have a rule: If we are seriously dating someone, you cannot be their friend on Facebook, allow them to follow you on Twitter and if it gets really deep, you might even want to block them from reading your blog posts.

 

Here’s the rub… what if they are already your “friend” or “follower” and THEN you start dating them? Ahhhhh, dating in 2011 just got interesting didn’t it? I’ll be blogging about that very soon but if we’re dating you’ll never get a chance to see that post now will you?

I need a certain amount of freedom to be me. I need to check in on Foursquare, write about my feelings and post content without censorship. So, while some folks need help NOT stalking other people, I need help making sure other people don’t cyber stalk me! That is all…

Amplify’d from thenextweb.com

On Christmas day 2009, my ex defriended me on Foursquare and stopped following me on Twitter.

Fair enough, I suppose. I didn’t need to know what bars he was going to and he didn’t need to read my 140-character self-deprecations. But I noticed his unfollow immediately and I cried, really hard. Three glasses of mulled cider later and I began to meditate on the aspects of sharing our lives, our work and our love online.

For all the other modern messes out there, here are 5 New Year’s social media related resolutions:

1. I will not stalk my ex on Facebook. There are so many different reasons why Facebook makes breaking up with people exponentially harder. First, if you were in an established Facebook relationship, the ensuing broken relationship will fill up your friends’ newsfeeds, dragging your already broken heart out into the virtual highway. Second, it means you have access to his or her life, even after you are no longer a part of it. If you don’t have enough willpower to avoid viewing your ex’s photos like a slideshow, then feel free to de-friend him or her. Just realize, that chances are they won’t ask for your friendship on Facebook ever again so it could make for an awkward digital reconciliation .

2. I will be more discerning with my friend requests. On Facebook, if your News Feed looks anything like mine these days, then you need to start being more discerning with your friend requests. Ask yourself 3 questions: Have I met this person in real life? Do we have mutual friends? Do I want this person to see photos of me and status updates for the rest of my Facebook using life? If no, then hit ignore or keep them on the wait list until you can answer yes to all three of those questions, otherwise known as Facebook purgatory.

On Foursquare, this is even more important. You can’t seriously want people you don’t even know to know where you are every time you check-in. That’s downright dangerous. I receive loads of Foursquare friend requests from people I don’t even know, most of the time its because they are new to the platform and haven’t realized Foursquare is more personal in nature than other platforms. But some of the time, the requests are simply scary.

3. I will not “auto” anything on Twitter. Don’t auto-follow. Don’t auto-DM. Don’t auto-tweet. Don’t do anything that shortcuts the already less-than-personal nature of social media. Nobody likes being on the receiving end of auto-generated messages, so don’t be the person to send them. In other words, be a human.

4. I will not spam my “friends” asking them to “Like me.” So you’re an artist, a fashion designer, or a musician, or you just think you’re going to be famous because you live in L.A. and you can breathe properly. Don’t badger your entire network asking them to “Like” you. If you’re really trying to get your message out there and gain notoriety ask your Mom, Dad, your roommate, a couple close friends, your boss and your significant other, but then stop there. More importantly, do something worth notoriety. If its truly notable, people will notice. It’s already a shallow effort and chances are you’ll piss off quite a few people who would’ve “Liked you” on their own without having you request their approval. Lastly, you’re devaluing the entire “Like” process by guilting your friends into adding one more “Like” to their Facebook page.

5. I will forget about MySpace. MySpace had its day, along with Ace of Base, white washed jeans and JNCOs. There are much better ways to waste your time on the Internet.

Read more at thenextweb.com

 

The Bing-Facebook Alliance… Watch Out Google… NOT!

OK, so Bing and Facebook “just made search social”. Fastcompany.com asks the question, “will your online life ever be the same again” after the Facebook-Bing alliance? Uh, yeah! I don’t care how “social” Facebook and Bing become (as if Facebook could even BE anymore social), they are not taking down the search giant, world dominating Google. Yeah, I said it.

Here are six take aways regarding the Bing-Facebook alliance. After reading this post, Google more on the topic. By the way, when you get to the point where your brand represents the services you offer, i.e. we Xerox when we want to make a copy and we reach for a Kleenex to blow our nose, then you have made it baby. Seriously, go Google it if you don’t believe me… I mean search it :-)

Amplify’d from www.fastcompany.com

It’s not too audacious to say that the new Bing search features that Microsoft and Facebook unveiled today are going to upend the search business.

Until now, search algorithms have used machine learning and artificial intelligence to predict which of the billions of pages out on the Internet might be most salient to your search. Now, at least on Bing, they’re going to have access to something even more precious: the knowledge of who your friends are and what they like.

Among the features Bing is rolling out to users in the coming days is a module called “Liked Results” to its search results. Looking for information on that new Tom Cruise movie? On Google, your search engine would serve up the relevant pages it has calculated are the most popular. On Bing, as of now, it serves up the regular Google-style results and a module that shows you pages your friends have liked — including, for example, movie reviews. You no longer have to do the work of trolling through search results to figure out which of the pages might tell you whether the movie’s a hit or a bomb. Trust your friend Sara’s taste? Click on the page she Liked.

So what does this all mean? Here are a few takeaways:

1. Search just reached an inflection point. Google’s great innovation was to figure out how to deliver the most relevant search results, based on the assumption that a webpage that had a large number of other pages linking to it would be more interesting than one with fewer links. Google has built its search algorithms by continuing to troll large sets of data for other attributes that indicate relevance. Now, however, Bing can deliver results based on what your trusted sources of information—your friends and acquaintances—think. This is a giant leap forward. Among other things, it means that…

2. Companies have to focus on creating great customer experiences. Because when their customers go searching online—for a movie, a camera, a travel destination—their friends’ recommendations are going to be front and center. Launched a store that no one “Liked?” you’re not going to show up in the search results.

3. Search is going to look a lot different. Forget the list of blue links. As Qi Lu, the engineering lead for the new changes (and president of Microfsoft’s Online Services Group), said, once you introduce a social dimension to search results, you could actually start representing search results—visually—in new ways. He didn’t say what those might look like, but be prepared to see them soon, because…

4. We’re going to be seeing even more social elements introduced into Bing’s search results. And soon. Both Microsoft and Facebook said that today’s new features were just the beginning. It only took them two months to gin up the ones they released today. Which means more are going to be coming down the pike in the months to come. Which means…

5. Google may have to go back to the drawing board. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg didn’t say they were shutting the search giant out. In fact, he said that, ultimately, the company would like to work with all players in search. But for now, it appears he’s working solely with Microsoft.

6. You must master your Facebook privacy settings. Mindful of earlier criticism of Facebook’s handling of privacy issues, both Microsoft and Facebook went out of their way today to stress that users will retain control over what Facebook shares with Bing. The flip side is that users actually have to exercise the control that Bing and Facebook give them. Don’t want your friends’s friends to know you Liked Justin Beiber’s fan page? Better check those privacy settings now.

Read more at www.fastcompany.com

Use your smartphone to call your Facebook friends for FREE anywhere in the world with Vonage Mobile for Facebook

Free cell phone calls… are you kidding me? I JUMPED at the chance to get AT&T out of my back pocket (although, truth be told, I rarely use my phone to make actually make phone calls). That aside, I downloaded the Vonage Facebook app anyway. It crashed four times and once I finally connected it to Facebook, it crashed again. I now how fragile these new apps can be so I wasn’t discouraged.

Once I finally got the app up an running I realized that, duh, in order to call my friends using the Vonage app… they too needed the Vonage app. Now I find myself having to be a salesperson for Vonage and get all my Facebook friends to sign up. This without knowing if this thing even works. I did send one instant message but no response back yet. Here are a few snafus I’ve noticed about this app right out of the gate:

1. Not all of my friends post their cell phone numbers on Facebook. I know I don’t. I give out my Google voice number but not my cell (I don’t personally know all those Facebook people I’m “friends” with and some of the ones that I do know… I don’t really want calling me!)

2. When you have a lot of Facebook “friends” (“a lot” being a relative word and I’m not bragging by any means) it takes FOREVER for the names to load in your Vonage Contacts list. When I want to call someone I just want to call them… wait it’s free… I think I can wait for the contact list to load.

3. I really need to see a business model. I don’t understand how they can give away free calls and IMs. I’m afraid they are going to get me hooked and then in three months roll out some outrageous fee.

That’s just my take on this new app. But you go ahead, download the Vonage app, give it a try and let me know what you think.

Amplify’d from mashable.com

VoIP giant Vonage has just introduced a new iPhone, iPod touch and Android app that allows users to call their Facebook friends for free. Vonage Mobile for Facebook [iTunes link] is similar to VOiP apps like Skype or Fring, but with a twist: It’s all about Facebook.

The free app does not require a Vonage subscription, but does require both parties to have the Vonage Mobile for Facebook app installed. Once installed, calls can be made over 3G or Wi-Fi.

The app is pretty simple to set up and only requires that you enter in your Facebook credentials once. Friends are displayed in different groups; those that can be called with the app have a “V” logo next to their names. If a friend is online but doesn’t have the app installed, you can chat with him or her and also send an invite to download the app.

Like the most recent Skype Mobile release, the app can run in the background, meaning that even if it’s not open, incoming calls can still come through. When an incoming call comes through the app, the caller’s Facebook photo and most recent status update are displayed on the screen.

This video shows how the app works:

The concept of making voice calls over Wi-Fi or 3G using a VOiP mobile application may no longer be new or novel, however, we appreciate that Vonage is targeting a specific set of users. For many individuals, Faceboo

See more at mashable.com