Digital Media News: Closing Out The Week With Five Things To Know

Ripped from the headlines, here are five things you should know this week for your digital and social media professional development.

Copyblogger: The Savvy Marketer’s Checklist for Seductive Landing Pages – Ever wonder what you could do to stop people from bouncing off your landing pages? You work hard to polish your sales copy. You’ve even recorded a snazzy demonstration video. But when you check your site’s analytics? You feel soooo frustrated. And the worst thing is … you don’t know what else you can do. How can you improve your conversion rates? Use the 40 tips in our landing page checklist to see where you’ve gone wrong. Or, use the checklist to create a landing page from scratch. See your email list grow faster, your webinars sell out, and your product sales go through the roof.

Here's What's NewRe/code: Twitter vs. Meerkat – Meerkat, the undisputed belle of the 2015 SXSW ball, was hobbled by Twitter’s mid-festival announcement of its acquisition of rival Periscope. The social video-sharing app had achieved a healthy dose of buzz for its savvy integration with the Twitter platform. Yet within hours of the news of its Periscope acquisition, Twitter fired the torpedoes: Informing its upstart rival that it would no longer have access to Twitter’s social graphing capabilities, which allowed Meerkat users to automatically push their livestreams out to their Twitter followers without building a separate contact list in the Meerkat app. Platform owner has significant power. Startup building on that platform is vulnerable. Platform owner capitalizes on its clout and attempts to move in for the kill. Sound familiar? It’s the hypothetical worst-case scenario so often cited by proponents of Title II net neutrality regulations — proponents including Twitter itself. [ED NOTE: This is the one to watch]

POLITICO: The Mobile Election – How smartphones will change the 2016 presidential race -As Hillary Clinton prepares for the formal launch of her campaign, and as Jeb Bush and Scott Walker are neck and neck in the polls, roughly two out of every three American adults, or 64 percent, own a smartphone, according to a new report from Pew. On the consumption side, the rise in mobile will “change politics the same way it is changing American life broadly,” said Ben Smith, the editor-in-chief of BuzzFeed. “People will organize and persuade on mobile devices and apps, the same way they live on them more broadly. Though mobile usage is highest among younger Americans, news consumption is “common even among older smartphone owners,” as “four-in-ten smartphone owners ages 65 and older use their phone at least occasionally to keep up with breaking news.” On the media side, the rise in mobile usage will increase the number of citizen reporters, whose influence on recent political campaigns has been quite significant. Video footage of an errant remark — from George Allen’s “Macaca” moment in 2006 to Mitt Romney’s “47 percent” moment in 2012 — can have more influence on a political campaign than any traditional news report.

Forbes: The Rise Of The Female CDO – The Chief Digital Officer is one role where women are outpacing men by two to one, according to a FierceCIO article citing research by Gartner , which also notes that the number of CDOs who are women has been growing dramatically every year. There are certainly some prominent examples, including Rachel Haot, CDO for New York State (and previously the City of New York), who was chosen Chief Digital Officer of the Year in 2014 by the CDO Club. Others include Jessica Federer at Bayer , Linda Avery of the Federal Reserve and Julie Bornstein, who holds the positions of both CMO and CDO of Sephora . [ED NOTE: Yay! That is all.]

1Harvard Business Review: Defining Strategy, Implementation, and Execution – It is striking how much confusion there is between strategy, implementation, and execution. Is “strategy” a matter of making choices about where we want to go, where we play and how we win, of setting goals and actions, about how we create and capture economic value over time? Is “getting things done” what we mean by implementation or execution? Do you “execute” or “implement” a strategy? And can you separate these from strategy formation? For strategy wonks like me, thinking about the definitions of these ideas provides endless fascination. For many business leaders, however, I find that the semantics matter a lot less. And that’s too bad because the semantics should matter. There are meaningful distinctions between strategy, implementation, and execution that are helpful to running a company or business in the real world. Ignoring, blurring, or getting them wrong creates sloppy thinking, deciding, and doing at all levels of an organization. Let’s start with strategy.

How an iPad can Improve Your Dining Experience

The next time you walk into your favorite restaurant you may be handed an iPad rather than a menu. Just think about the possibilities. You’ll be able to see what your dish will look like ahead of time, get the calorie count of your order, have a wine pairing picked out for you and send any modifications you may want directly to the server’s iPad.

For some restaurants, when it comes to wine orders, having the iPad act as a virtual sommelier is proving to be a great business tool. Digital wine lists have reported a significant increase in profits from wine sales. I see this as a win-win. It combines two of my favorite things… mobile technology and wine. Now, if only they could develop a scratch and smell app!

Amplify’d from www.travelandleisure.com

201102-b-ipadjpg

With the release of the iPad nearly one year ago, the device is changing the way we do business. And while it might seem an unlikely combination, even restaurants have hopped on the bandwagon. Yes, a handful are loading their menus onto iPads for customers to peruse—a costly and wasteful business practice, all in the name of flashiness, as far as I’m concerned. But that’s not exactly what I’m talking about; there are more and more turning iPads into useful (and yes, flashy) tools that actually improve the dining experience.

What I’ve been seeing are restaurants digitizing their extensive wine offerings specifically for the iPad. Why am I inclined to value this more than a simple digital food menu? Because besides just listing out the wines, these apps, like the one implemented at Hotel Casa del Mar’s Catch Restaurant in Santa Monica, also offer a wealth of information to help you decide on the perfect wine…that is, without the assistance of an on-site sommelier. (Which, let’s be honest, you’re hard-pressed to find at most restaurants.) Catch’s iPad wine list lets diners browse wines by year, price, tasting notes, high-res images, where it was made, and even dish selection. And with more than 200 wines in their cellar, a little help is more than welcome!

But Catch isn’t the first, nor will it be the last, to put this technological twist on the age-old drink. In Atlanta, Bone’s has a similar app for its 1,300 plus wines, with extensive details, year, region and price. Here in NYC, South Gate has a similar app for its 600 plus bottle collection; Naples Tomato, in—you guessed it—Naples, FL has one for its 500 plus bottles; and Chicago Cut Steakhouse recently debuted its digital 800 plus bottle list.

Oh, and did I mention? In case you’re wondering just how useful this is, most of the restaurants with digital wine lists have reported a significant increase in profits from wine sales.

Read more at www.travelandleisure.com

How an iPad can Improve Your Dining Experience

The next time you walk into your favorite restaurant you may be handed an iPad rather than a menu. Just think about the possibilities. You’ll be able to see what your dish will look like ahead of time, get the calorie count of your order, have a wine pairing picked out for you and send any modifications you may want directly to the server’s iPad.

For some restaurants, when it comes to wine orders, having the iPad act as a virtual sommelier is proving to be a great business tool. Digital wine lists have reported a significant increase in profits from wine sales. I see this as a win-win. It combines two of my favorite things… mobile technology and wine. Now, if only they could develop a scratch and smell app!

Amplify’d from www.travelandleisure.com

201102-b-ipadjpgWith the release of the iPad nearly one year ago, the device is changing the way we do business. And while it might seem an unlikely combination, even restaurants have hopped on the bandwagon. Yes, a handful are loading their menus onto iPads for customers to peruse—a costly and wasteful business practice, all in the name of flashiness, as far as I’m concerned. But that’s not exactly what I’m talking about; there are more and more turning iPads into useful (and yes, flashy) tools that actually improve the dining experience.

What I’ve been seeing are restaurants digitizing their extensive wine offerings specifically for the iPad. Why am I inclined to value this more than a simple digital food menu? Because besides just listing out the wines, these apps, like the one implemented at Hotel Casa del Mar’s Catch Restaurant in Santa Monica, also offer a wealth of information to help you decide on the perfect wine…that is, without the assistance of an on-site sommelier. (Which, let’s be honest, you’re hard-pressed to find at most restaurants.) Catch’s iPad wine list lets diners browse wines by year, price, tasting notes, high-res images, where it was made, and even dish selection. And with more than 200 wines in their cellar, a little help is more than welcome!

But Catch isn’t the first, nor will it be the last, to put this technological twist on the age-old drink. In Atlanta, Bone’s has a similar app for its 1,300 plus wines, with extensive details, year, region and price. Here in NYC, South Gate has a similar app for its 600 plus bottle collection; Naples Tomato, in—you guessed it—Naples, FL has one for its 500 plus bottles; and Chicago Cut Steakhouse recently debuted its digital 800 plus bottle list.

Oh, and did I mention? In case you’re wondering just how useful this is, most of the restaurants with digital wine lists have reported a significant increase in profits from wine sales.

Read more at www.travelandleisure.com

 

MTV, Universal Call Truce In Digital Rights Battle For VMAs

In a war over video streaming rights, MTV.com and Universal Music Group are playing nice in the sandbox… for now… so viewers can vote on videos. Which brings up the question, when an artist leaves a label… who owns the rights to stream their music videos that were recorded while at the label?

Amplify’d from adage.com
Justin Bieber is a nominee in the Best New Artist category for this year's MTV VMA's.

 

Justin Bieber is a nominee in the Best New Artist category for this year’s MTV VMA’s.

Viacom-owned MTV.com recently lost its rights to stream videos from Universal artists such as Lady Gaga, Justin Bieber and Kanye West when their deal expired in July. The two companies couldn’t agree on digital-advertising terms.

But according to MTV, Universal has provisionally allowed the website to publish its artists’ videos strictly for the purpose of the Video Music Awards, to be held in Los Angeles on Sept. 21.

“They did grant us digital rights,” MTV Networks Senior VP Jeannie Kedas said of Universal. “[I] think they recognize the value of MTV’s VMA’s for their artists.”

Indeed, the awards show is perhaps the premier event for popular music, a necessary stage for every label’s artists. Many of this year’s nominees and headliners are signed to Universal, the world’s largest record label.

A significant part of the awards process allows viewers to vote online, which ends Aug. 24. Though MTV.com had been proscribed from running Universal’s videos, the temporary truce allows for the viewing of their videos for the voting process.

Universal declined comment, but a label executive previously told Ad Age that they are seeking standard syndication terms.

Read more at adage.com

 

MTV, Universal Call Truce In Digital Rights Battle For VMAs

In a war over video streaming rights, MTV.com and Universal Music Group are playing nice in the sandbox… for now… so viewers can vote on videos. Which brings up the question, when an artist leaves a label… who owns the rights to stream their music videos that were recorded while at the label?

Amplify’d from adage.com
Justin Bieber is a nominee in the Best New Artist category for this year's MTV VMA's.

Justin Bieber is a nominee in the Best New Artist category for this year’s MTV VMA’s.

Viacom-owned MTV.com recently lost its rights to stream videos from Universal artists such as Lady Gaga, Justin Bieber and Kanye West when their deal expired in July. The two companies couldn’t agree on digital-advertising terms.

But according to MTV, Universal has provisionally allowed the website to publish its artists’ videos strictly for the purpose of the Video Music Awards, to be held in Los Angeles on Sept. 21.

“They did grant us digital rights,” MTV Networks Senior VP Jeannie Kedas said of Universal. “[I] think they recognize the value of MTV’s VMA’s for their artists.”

Indeed, the awards show is perhaps the premier event for popular music, a necessary stage for every label’s artists. Many of this year’s nominees and headliners are signed to Universal, the world’s largest record label.

A significant part of the awards process allows viewers to vote online, which ends Aug. 24. Though MTV.com had been proscribed from running Universal’s videos, the temporary truce allows for the viewing of their videos for the voting process.

Universal declined comment, but a label executive previously told Ad Age that they are seeking standard syndication terms.

Read more at adage.com

 

New Digital Cameras from Samsung – more gadgets I didn’t know I couldn’t l ive without

You’re a power user. You have a budget of $400.00. Do you upgrade to a new iPhone 4, do you get an HD flip (both without flash capability) or do you invest in one of the new digital cameras about to hit the market?

When I covered the Press Junket for the Essence Festival I had my iPhone, my Blackberry (it saved the day when I couldn’t post on my iPhone) and a digital camera in tow. It is a wonder I didn’t drop anything or leave one of them behind. If I was on a deserted island and could pick just one gadget it would be my iPhone. I like being able to post instantly… and with ease… to YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, Flickr, Amplify, my blogs… on and on and on. So, unless these slick new gadgets are going to give me the ability to do a one step post (I’m not reading the instructions… I have no idea why… I’m just not) then I’m sticking with what I have. Just in case you are more apt to read how to use these new gadget, here are two cameras are rolling out this fall you may like. You be the judge.

Amplify’d from www.entrepreneur.com

Smartphones with dual cameras such as Apple’s iPhone 4 and Sprint’s HTC EVO 4G are tremendously popular lately. But while these cellular handsets sport one lens that faces frontward and the other back, enabling mobile videoconferencing, they’re still in the minority, and most offer only middling photographic resolutions. Thankfully for entrepreneurs who need a new headshot, product images for press kits or a steady stream of pictures to fuel their social media strategy, digital cameras are also adding new perspectives. See Samsung’s new ST100 ($349.99) and ST600 ($329.99), both launching in September, which offer twin LCD displays that promise to greatly aid in capturing the perfect shot.

Both models offer 14.2 megapixel photographic resolutions, letting you capture images suitable for use on the web, in print or blown up to larger poster sizes for deployment at events and speaking engagements. Equipped with so-called DualView technology, while neither allows for voice or video calling, the pair does boast 1.8-inch front-facing LCD screens which make it simpler to frame shots as well. As a result, snapping pictures or taping 720p high-definition videos (especially self portraits, group shots or video blogs and diaries) should prove that much more effortless. Because you can see what’s happening and your position in the picture while either camera is actively trained upon you, it takes much of the guesswork out of playing shutterbug.

Offered in a sleek form factor, a range o

Read more at www.entrepreneur.com