If You Can’t Beat ’em, Join ’em. Time Warner Decides To Join Forces With Google

A staggering stat (from Google) indicated that YouTube (owned by Google) has more content uploaded in 60 days then the three major TV networks broadcast in 60 years. It would stand to reason then that the networks would want to become play ball with Google. This is exactly what Time Warner Inc. is doing by playing ball with Google Inc. Not to be outdone, NBC Universal’s CNBC network and the NBA also announced they would build Google TV software applications. The plan for Google world domination continues.

Amplify’d from www.wallstreetjournal.com
The chief executive of Time Warner Inc. said he is turning to Google Inc. as an ally in his push to bring cable shows to users across various devices and that the Web giant’s new service for accessing and searching Internet programming on TVs isn’t the threat many television distributors fear.

Jeffrey Bewkes, who oversees a company that includes the TNT, TBS and HBO cable networks, also predicted a “massive amount of competition” for Netflix Inc. and Hulu LLC as more content owners make their TV shows available through operators on demand and online and as cable and satellite companies improve their experiences.

“When all of the content on the big screen works like the content on the little screen what will happen? The programming will trump the interface,” he said.

[BEWKES] Bloomberg NewsTime Warner CEO Jeff Bewkes, shown in May, says content is still key.

Mr. Bewkes’s comments come as media executives are agonizing over which new Internet distributors to supply shows to and whether to pursue new digital distribution methods on their own. Hulu and Netflix had no comment.

Time Warner has been championing a model it calls “TV Everywhere,” allowing cable and satellite subscribers to watch the TV shows they pay for in their traditional TV bundles online, free.

Tuesday Mr. Bewkes said that Time Warner, which already has deals to enable Comcast Corp. and Verizon Communications Inc. subscribers to watch shows from its cable networks online, has or is close to finalizing similar deals with Dish Network Corp., DirecTV Group Inc., AT&T Inc. and other cable operators as well.

Monday, the company also endorsed the Google TV technology, saying it would optimize some of its television websites, including those of TNT, TBS and CNN, for viewing on TVs carrying Google TV. It said it would do the same with its HBO GO website, through which some viewers who subscribe to the premium cable channel can watch its shows online. The arrangement isn’t a business deal.

Google is working with several partners to build televisions and boxes carrying its software. Logitech International SA plans to discuss its set-top box running Google’s new software Wednesday.

NBC Universal’s CNBC network and the NBA also announced they would build Google TV software applications that provide access to content like financial news and sports scores. Other television networks—including the major broadcast networks—have largely been mum about whether they plan to work with Google’s service.

Read more at www.wallstreetjournal.com

 

Can You MAKE Content Go Viral? The Science Behind Viral Brand Marketing

I always hate it when a client says, “I want to do this, that and the other and then I want to make it go viral”. I shoot back you can’t make anything go viral. You sneeze and you may or may not pass on the virus. It’s the same on the Internet. You post good content and it may or may not catch on. Apparently I am incorrect and there is a science to sharing with platforms that inject data into the “art of going viral”.

Amplify’d from www.adweek.com
In 2001, grad student Jonah Peretti accidentally created an Internet sensation when e-mails of his attempts to put “sweatshop” on sneakers customized with Nike ID went viral. In 2005, he set out to repeat his unexpected success with far different content: Black People Love Us, a parody site of a quintessentially white couple’s efforts to ingratiate themselves with African Americans. It also became a viral hit.

This convinced Peretti that the “mysterious” world of viral content can be broken down and made somewhat predictable. He went on to found content-sharing platform BuzzFeed in 2006 on the proposition that science can be applied to content creation to up the chances of viral appeal.

“There’s an underlying human impulse to share ideas and experiences,” said Peretti. “There are certain types of content that make you want to share them because they’ve put you in a social mind-set.”

Now, BuzzFeed and other Web-sharing platforms such as StumbleUpon, Digg and even Twitter and Facebook are providing advertisers with an entrée into the stream of shared content by posting brand content on their sites. On top of this, they’re then using the viral data to help ignite sharing that can meld paid impressions with earned media.

They’ve done just that for advertisers like National Geographic, AOL and DonQ.

Last week, Pepsi began a test with BuzzFeed to see if it could generate what PepsiCo Beverages head of digital Shiv Singh calls “impressions plus.” Pepsi already had a TV spot that recently proved popular on YouTube, with 100,000 views in under a week. BuzzFeed, knowing that content with lists is more often shared, used the spot in a content package called “Top 10 Most Iconic Pepsi Commercials of All Time.” It has proven only mildly popular, netting 946 viral views on top of 2,700 seeded views.

Singh said Pepsi would evaluate the best way to utilize BuzzFeed based on its performance so far.

There’s a persistent argument that if a brand’s content is good enough — think: the recent Old Spice “The Man Your Man Could Smell Like” social media response campaign — it doesn’t need advertising. But that’s mostly a myth, Peretti contends, pointing out that even Burger King’s “Subservient Chicken” benefited from a national TV campaign promoting the site.

 

Can You MAKE Content Go Viral? The Science Behind Viral Brand Marketing

I always hate it when a client say, “I want to do this, that and the other and then I want to make it go viral”. I shoot back you can’t make anything go viral. You sneeze and you may or may not pass on the virus. It’s the same on the Internet. You post good content and it may or may not catch on. Apparently I am incorrect and there is a science to sharing with platforms that inject data into the “art of going viral”.

Amplify’d from www.adweek.com

adweek/photos/stylus/147458-socialnetillustration.jpg

In 2001, grad student Jonah Peretti accidentally created an
Internet sensation when e-mails of his attempts to put “sweatshop”
on sneakers customized with Nike ID went viral. In 2005, he set out
to repeat his unexpected success with far different content: Black
People Love Us, a parody site of a quintessentially white couple’s
efforts to ingratiate themselves with African Americans. It also
became a viral hit.

This convinced Peretti that the “mysterious” world of viral content
can be broken down and made somewhat predictable. He went on to
found content-sharing platform BuzzFeed in 2006 on the proposition
that science can be applied to content creation to up the chances
of viral appeal.

“There’s an underlying human impulse to share ideas and
experiences,” said Peretti. “There are certain types of content
that make you want to share them because they’ve put you in a
social mind-set.”

Now, BuzzFeed and other Web-sharing platforms such as StumbleUpon,
Digg and even Twitter and Facebook are providing advertisers with
an entrée into the stream of shared content by posting brand
content on their sites. On top of this, they’re then using the
viral data to help ignite sharing that can meld paid impressions
with earned media.

They’ve done just that for advertisers like National Geographic,
AOL and DonQ.

Last week, Pepsi began a test with BuzzFeed to see if it could
generate what PepsiCo Beverages head of digital Shiv Singh calls
“impressions plus.” Pepsi already had a TV spot that recently
proved popular on YouTube, with 100,000 views in under a week.
BuzzFeed, knowing that content with lists is more often shared,
used the spot in a content package called
“Top 10 Most Iconic Pepsi Commercials of All Time.”
It
has proven only mildly popular, netting 946 viral views on top of
2,700 seeded views.

Singh said Pepsi would evaluate the best way to utilize BuzzFeed
based on its performance so far.

There’s a persistent argument that if a brand’s content is good
enough — think: the recent Old Spice “The Man Your Man Could Smell
Like” social media response campaign — it doesn’t need
advertising. But that’s mostly a myth, Peretti contends, pointing
out that even Burger King’s “Subservient Chicken” benefited from a
national TV campaign promoting the site.Read more at www.adweek.com

 

Do “content mills” degrade the overall quality of content on the web?

We live in a fast paced, digital age. Does that mean we have to give up good quality writing and reporting to stay relevant on the web?

Amplify’d from news.cnet.com

Will we soon see blog posts labeled as though they were certified-organic fruits?

(Credit:CC: Flickr user dlytle)

Walk through the produce aisles of any grocery store and on the outsides of avocados, pomegranates, mushrooms, and just about everything else you’ll see an astonishing number of stickers and labels advertising various kinds of quality standards: certified organic, fair-trade, all-natural, locally grown, and so forth.

Might we soon be seeing the same kinds of labels on digital content?

A small trade group called the Internet Content Syndication Council (ICSC) has been circulating a document since late May–highlighted Tuesday in an AdWeek article–to drum up industry concern about “content mills,” a fast-growing sector of the digital media business that publish loads of cheap, fast stories (mostly created by low-paid freelancers) that rank high in search engine results, and run ads against them. Content mills like Demand Media, AOL’s Seed.com, and Associated Content (freshly acquired by Yahoo) say they’re streamlining the creation of print and multimedia content up to the speed of the Digital Age, filling up holes in the Web with new, often very niche-oriented material. But they have also unleashed a bogeyman of a business model onto the Web, with many journalists and media outlets claiming that their craft is getting cheapened, perhaps fatally so.

“The rise of ‘content mills’ threatens to degrade the overall quality of content, thereby reducing the usefulness of the Internet for users seeking information–and also for the advertisers who want a good environment for their messages,” the ICSC document reads. “To counter this threat, the Internet Content Syndication Council believes the time has come to start an industry discussion about the best way to preserve standards of quality for informational content.”

Read more at news.cnet.com

Content Creators Cashing in on Blip.tv

Do you have video content… then you should be getting paid!

Amplify’d from mashable.com

Blip.tv is sending out more checks to its content providers than ever. The New York-based independent web shows platform has increased the number of payouts to its content creators by 77% between Q1 to Q2 of this year, Co-founder Dina Kaplan told Mashable in a recent interview.

Blip.tv, which aims to be “the next-generation television network,” recently celebrated its five-year anniversary. It has seen substantial growth in the last year, attracting 96 million video views a month and increasing its payouts by 119% from Q4 2009 to Q2 of 2010 with a 50/50 split for content creators.

“We’re seeing more shows making more than $10,000 a quarter more than ever before,” Kaplan said.

So what’s next for Blip? Kaplan said the company is focusing on design and functionality of the site. “We’re ramping up to do a lot more, all around,” Kaplan said. Some of this includes figuring out how to get Blip.tv in front of more eyeballs and making people aware of the site through strategic marketing, she said.

Read more at mashable.com