Photo-Driven, Multiple-Element Magazines a ‘Tough Nut’ on E-Readers

Jason Fell of Foliomag.com sits down with Hal Greenberg, a Partner at VSS Structured Capital Funds to discuss the future of magazine publishing

Amplify’d from www.foliomag.com

Not long after media and information private equity firm Veronis Suhler Stevenson released its annual communications industry forecast, I spoke with partner Hal Greenberg about the firm’s projections for consumer and trade magazines through 2014. In regard to consumer publishing, Greenberg said all eyes will be on how the flood of e-readers to the market will continue to affect business moving forward.

“What will be interesting is what impact the iPads and Kindles of the world will have on consumer magazines,” Greenberg said. “Right now, the subscription models aren’t particularly good. But, that will ultimately change. We think they will be a significant factor over the next several years.”

Greenberg, a partner of VSS Structured Capital Funds, continued, adding some thoughts on how magazines might have more success than others in making the jump to reading devices:

When you look at consumer magazines, there are all different types. You have types like Time and Newsweek, which are primarily narrative, story driven. Those are easy on the iPad. When you look at, say, a beauty magazine, the whole look of the physical magazine is very important. That, I think, will be more of a challenge on the iPad—those types of magazines might actually withstand better in print on the newsstand.

A magazine like Vogue, for instance, which is so beautiful on page, is a tough nut on an iPad. The glossy design is unique and how that makes its way to an iPad is a difficult thing. Meanwhile, a Newsweek or a Time or the Atlantic is pretty easy, actually better, on the iPad. You can easily pick the stories you want to get into versus having so many smaller elements.

Well, Vogue hasn’t made it to the iPad yet, but sister title Glamour has. Like Vogue, Glamour is known for glossy pictures and multiple style elements. And still, publisher Condé Nast is excited for the app, which was built in-house and announced last week.

Read more at www.foliomag.com

The disconnect between marketers and consumers on Twitter

Twitter and marketing: The real story (or so says a new study)

Amplify’d from holykaw.alltop.com

Marketers could use a little help when it comes to connecting with consumers on Twitter, so says a new study by digital-marketing agency 360i. The study examined 1,800 tweets over a period of six months and found that “marketers use Twitter to broadcast, while consumers use it to converse.”

A sampling of the findings:

  • 43% of consumer tweets are conversations with other users, while only 16% of marketer tweets engage in dialogue with consumers. Add to that, only 1% of consumer tweets are dialogues with brands.
  • Only 12% of consumer tweets mention brands by name with Twitter, Apple, and Google ranking at the top of most mentioned brands.

Full story at USA Today.

Read more at holykaw.alltop.com

 

Holy Kaw! All the topics that interest us The disconnect between marketers and consumers on Twitter

Twitter and marketing: The real story (or so says a new study)

Amplify’d from holykaw.alltop.com

Marketers could use a little help when it comes to connecting with consumers on Twitter, so says a new study by digital-marketing agency 360i. The study examined 1,800 tweets over a period of six months and found that “marketers use Twitter to broadcast, while consumers use it to converse.”

A sampling of the findings:

  • 43% of consumer tweets are conversations with other users, while only 16% of marketer tweets engage in dialogue with consumers. Add to that, only 1% of consumer tweets are dialogues with brands.
  • Only 12% of consumer tweets mention brands by name with Twitter, Apple, and Google ranking at the top of most mentioned brands.

Full story at USA Today.

Read more at holykaw.alltop.com

 

The hottest new technology… of the ’80s!

If you came of age in the ’80 then beside the memories of our bad hair you must also remember your first answering machine (why could my parents not get the concept), our BIG, gigantic, cell phones and the portable Walkmen. We thought we were so cutting edge!

Amplify’d from www.howstuffworks.com

80s computer equipment
­Do you remember having a walkman and watching VHS?

If you lived through the 1980s, then you know it was an amazing decade. It seemed like every month some cool new technology came onto the market. Many of the most popular consumer products today made their mark in the 1980s.

To see just how much happened in this decade, here are a dozen technologies that became popular in the 1980s:

  • Personal computers
  • Graphical user interface
  • CDs
  • Walkmans
  • VCRs
  • Camcorders
  • Video game consoles
  • Cable television
  • Answering machines
  • Cell phones
  • Portable phones
  • Fax machines

­

Get started with the first technology gadget from the 1980s on the next page.

Read more at www.howstuffworks.com