Know The Length of Everything Online

Have you ever wondered how long your blog posts should be? That email you just sent, was it too wordy? What about your Facebook update? Did it go on forever? Maybe you’ve agonized over the proper word count for a blog title. Oh, come on, don’t act like it’s just me.

How long should your email be? How many characters should you use in your Facebook post? What is the proper count for use as your titles, tags, and other descriptions?

A lot of time has been put into calculating the exact length of titles, tags, posts and everything in between. The crazy good people at The Next Web have found out the best length for everything on the Internet. In fact, I may be typing too much right now! Take a look.

The-Length-of-Everything-online infographi

Editors Note: I took their advice. The title of this blog is only six characters, as they indicated it should be. Interestingly enough, the title of their blog was eight words. Things that make you go, hmmm.

Huffpo Bloggers: Do You Feel Exploited?

A team of researchers from U.C. Santa Barbara’s Carsey-Wolf Center are polling Huffpo bloggers to see how they feel about their free labor. Answer options for that last question include “Bloggers should form a union,” “Bloggers should withhold their labor” and “Bloggers should launch a publicity campaign.” Yes, yes and yes but let’s not hold our breath waiting for it to happen!

Amplify’d from blogs.forbes.com
DALLAS, TX - FEBRUARY 05:  (FILE PHOTO) Co-fou...

Is she running a platform or a plantation? That’s for her bloggers to say. Image by Getty Images for AOL via @daylife

The Newspaper Guild says the Huffington Post is taking advantage of its unpaid bloggers. Huffpo says its bloggers are only too happy to write for free. What do the bloggers themselves say? With a few exceptions, we haven’t heard much from them.

A team of researchers from U.C. Santa Barbara’s Carsey-Wolf Center aims to change that. The researchers are polling Huffpo bloggers under the aegis of the Media Industries Project, which studies trends in media culture with a focus on digital media, globalization and creative labor.

“We have been planning this survey from the time we heard about the merger,” says Ryan Fuller, a doctoral candidate working on the study, via email. “The merger provides an opportunity to focus on the conditions of digital labor (e.g., bloggers), and who is responsible for value creation (contributors v. distributors) in the digital environment.”

The survey is being conducted independently, without cooperation by Huffpo or AOL. Since researchers had to track down subjects’ email addresses themselves, only a fraction of Huffpo’s 9,000 bloggers are being polled. The questions being asked include:

-Do you feel you should receive part of the $315 million AOL used to purchase the Huffington Post?

-Do you feel that the Huffington Post’s brand has changed since the merger with AOL?

-How would you compare the conditions at the Huffington Post to other sites you have blogged for?

-Some have raised concerns about the labor arrangement bloggers have with The Huffington Post. In your opinion, what do you think is the best way for bloggers to address the issue of compensation for digital labor?

Answer options for that last question include “Bloggers should form a union,” “Bloggers should withhold their labor” and “Bloggers should launch a publicity campaign.”

Fuller says results from the survey will be published in April.

Read more at blogs.forbes.com

 

Arianna Huffington: We Can Finally Explain What Bloggers Are And Why They Should Get Paid

The Huffington Post… kicking butt and taking name but mostly… paying bloggers and understanding the value of paying us for our content. I think I’ll start following The Huffington Post on Twitter again 🙂

Amplify’d from www.businessinsider.com

Only five years after its launch, the Huffington Post is rivaling established news publications such as the New York Times in terms of popularity online, and it is on track to take over the world.

Co-founder and editor-in-chief Arianna Huffington says her publication’s path to glory has come along with its share of failures.

The biggest mistake of all, says Huffington, was confusing the public about the definition and role of the new media format — as known as blogging.

Watch Arianna discuss the difference between reporters and bloggers, why paying bloggers (once a controversial debate) is now acceptable (although HuffPo relies on contributions from many unpaid bloggers), and how public participation has changed over the last five years.

Read more at www.businessinsider.com

Online Targeted Marketing Works!

It was billed as “an exclusive, multi-market, multicultural blogger event”.  It turned out to be a major success for  “The Glam Squad Remixx” and for those of us in attendance.  Partnering with Warner Bros. Pictures and New Line Cinema’s highly-anticipated film SEX AND THE CITY 2, Liquid Soul Media unveiled “The Glam Squad Remixx”, an African-American female blogger-driven online initiative that not only celebrated the film’s release, but encouraged attendees to bring their own fashionista style to the VIP reception and screening taking place in three target markets: DC, Atlanta and Charlotte.

Each event was hosted by a popular fashion and entertainment blogger, commonly referred to as a “social scientist”, and included a red carpet reception and a private screening of SEX AND THE CITY 2.  According to pitchengine.com:

“The Glam Squad Remixx” celebrates the style ingenuity and sisterhood amongst African-American women nationwide. By partnering with TheYBF.com, Charlotte STYLE Magazine, BET Beauty Lounge and HoneyMag.com to host the events, there is a perfect opportunity for their online communities to dialogue about the experience of this event and the affinity African-American females have for SEX AND THE CITY 2, and to showcase how they “remixed” their city’s personal style.

The DC screening was hosted by Natasha E., writer and editor for the Young, Black and Fabulous gossip blog (TheYBF.com).  The event was a bit of an anomaly, using the mighty power of an online community, female bloggers and social media to fill the venue.  According to Natasha, the event sold out in less than two minutes.  That’s 300 seats in under 120 seconds.  Now, can anyone really deny the power of social media?

The event was a great time and the movie is a “must see” for a girls night out.  But in doing some background research for my own blog entry on Women Are Always Beautiful,  I found a great resource in PitchEngine.   PitchEngine, the next-generation PR platform, is a great way the media can “follow and filter only the content that matters to them.  If they see something they like, they can interact privately, one-to-one with the Pitch creator.”

“We built Pitch for journalist and bloggers instead of the other way around. It used to be acceptable to just blindly send press releases to media, but these days there’s just too much junk out there,” said Jason Kintzler, PitchEngine’s founder and CEO.

I’m new to this platform and I love the spin they have put on “social media relations”.  I’m so excited I found it.  I’m keeping my eye platform AND I will absolutely use it!