The iPhone vs. Android: What’s the Big Difference?

Look, I’m Team Apple all the way and my Droid geeky friends get sick of posting about Mac products all the time. I’m not paid by Apple and I don’t get paid to blog about gadgets (although, if you know of a gig like that opening up can you PLEASE let me know!). I’m just a power user and a Geek Diva Gadget Girl who likes her techie toys. I’m in love with my iPhone, my Mac Pro and I can hardly contain myself waiting for the new iPad 2. But, if you’re still on the fence and want a comparison between the two hottest smartphone options on the planet (sorry Blackberry, I abandoned you in 2009… RIM sucks the big one… OK, truth be told I still have a Blackberry but that’s beside the point) then this article may help you decide.

Amplify’d from manofthehouse.com
 Thesmartphone has become the Swiss Army knife of the 21st century: endlessly useful, cool, and a necessary tool that every man should carry. The difference is that smart phones carry a hefty cost, and they’re not all designed equally well.Two of the most popular smartphones are the ubiquitous Apple iPhone and its new challenger, Google’s Android platform. Here’s a look at how the two phone giants stack up.

Usability

First, we need to be clear about something. There’s no official “Android” phone, just as there’s no official “Windows” computer. Android is simply the name for Google’s mobile operating system, and as such, it’s somewhat difficult to compare the iPhone to Android without being biased. Many functions of the iPhone seem to work more intuitively than those on Android phones, but that’s mainly because the iPhone and its operating system were designed to work together, while Android was designed to be used on a variety of phones made by a variety of manufacturers.

Therefore, if you’re looking for that “wow, cool!” factor, you’re probably going to be more impressed with what the iPhone has to offer. Every function of the iPhone seems to work effortlessly, with intuitive touch-screen controls that have made it the weapon of choice for countless hipsters in coffee shops everywhere. However, most of what the iPhone offers is available on Android phones. You want the web? The Android phones can get you there. You want a touch screen? Android phones have that, too. In fact, the best Android phone currently available, the Nexus One, feels completely natural.

The big difference is that the iPhone is a single device, while Android is a software platform. That makes a straight comparison difficult but not impossible; it’s like comparing Macs to PCs, as many bloggers have noted. Apple carefully controls everything available on its iPhone. Google’s Android, on the other hand, offers its adherents something else: freedom to do whatever you’d like with your phone.

Read more at manofthehouse.com

iPhone users are the most loyal smartphone owners

The smartphone war continues! Worldwide, it seems iPhone users are sticking with their Apple smartphone. For me, I love the Apple interface of the Mac Book Pro, iPhone, iPod(s) and iPad. I’m not so sure that I’m loyal to the product line as much as I want an seemless interaction between my most used devises and therefore I stick with Apple. Well, that and the fact that Apple offers great products. Either way, we’re winning customer loyalty… for now.

Amplify’d from www.mobile-ent.biz
iPhone users are the most loyal smartphone owners

59% say they’re sticking with iOS

New research from GfK claims that nearly six in ten iPhone owners plan to stay loyal to iOS – well ahead of rival smartphone operating systems.

35% of BlackBerry owners say they’ll stay loyal to RIM, while the results for Android, Symbian and Windows Mobile are 28%, 24% and 21% respectively.

The stats are important: they show how rapidly the smartphone market is changing. Symbian remains the most popular OS, but if 76% of those users are eyeing rival platforms, its share may slide fast in the next 12-18 months.

That said, Android’s low loyalty score is also surprising. Google is activating hundreds of thousands of devices a day, but it seems it has yet to engender Apple-level loyalty in its new users.

GfK’s research is based on an online survey of 2,653 mobile users in Brazil, Germany, Spain, the UK, the US and China.

Read more at www.mobile-ent.biz

iPhone Users Download Average of 40 Apps, Android 25, BlackBerry 14

I don’t know what is more interesting to me… that iPhone users are only downloading an average of 40 apps, or that the Nielsen company is did the research for this article. Things that make you go… hmmmm…

Amplify’d from www.intomobile.com

Nielsen AppCategories Study: iPhone Users Download Average of 40 Apps, Android 25, BlackBerry 14The last we had heard in mobile app research was a forecast that there would be 25 billion downloads by 2015, and along the same vein, Nielsen has released the results of a survey of some 4,000 mobile users about their application downloading habits. As you’d expect, iPhone users were the most active, with an average of 40 apps installed, while those with an Android phone had 25. BlackBerry trailed significantly with an average of 14 applications, and across all platforms, the average worked out to 27 applications. Those numbers are all up from December,  showing that even on BlackBerry, interest in mobile apps is growing. No surprise there.

There was also a categorical breakdown of the kinds of apps people were downloading; games were at the forefront, with 61% of smartphone-owning respondents having downloaded one in the last month, followed by weather, maps, social networking, and music. Facebook, Pandora, the Weather Channel, and Google Maps ranked among the top five used applications across all platforms.

I wish there was more usage data published, as I would like to see how often downloaded apps are used on a platform-by-platform basis. I know that on BlackBerry, I have a select few apps, but I make use of them pretty regularly, while my iPod Touch is loaded to the gills with applications that I’ll use maybe once every two months (if that). My brief experience with Android is somewhere in between; maybe half I’ll use with any consistency, and the others are highly situational.

Average per-device application downloads rank in the same order as the size of their respective app stores. At last count, the iTunes App Store had a buxom 250,000 iOS apps, the Android Market sat comfortably in the middle with 80,000 titles, and BlackBerry App World recently broke 10,000.  Obviously if user activity is high, developers will be more interested in getting into the app store, overcrowding be damned.

Read more at www.intomobile.com

Move over Apple, you may not be the sexiest phone afterall!

As the smartphone wars continue, it looks like the iPhone (my preference for it’s integration into all my other Apple products) is getting some stiffer competition. Will Apple’s culture hurt the iPhone?

Amplify’d from www.nytimes.com

If you want a smartphone powered by Google’s Android software, you could get Motorola’s Droid 2 or its cousin, the Droid X. Then there is the Droid Incredible from HTC, the Fascinate from Samsung and the Ally from LG.

Paul Sakuma/Associated Press -Steven P. Jobs, in 1984, presented the new Macintosh personal computer.

 

That’s just on Verizon Wireless. An additional 20 or so phones running Android are available in the United States, and there are about 90 worldwide.

But if your preference is an Apple-powered phone, you can buy — an iPhone.

That very short list explains in part why, for all its success in the phone business, Apple suddenly has a real fight on its hands.

Americans now are buying more Android phones than iPhones. If that trend continues, analysts say that in little more than a year, Android will have erased the iPhone’s once enormous lead in the high end of the smartphone market.

But this is not the first time Apple has found itself in this kind of fight, where its flagship product is under siege from a loose alliance of rivals selling dozens of competing gadgets.

In the early 1980s, the Macintosh faced an onslaught of competition from an army of PC makers whose products ran Microsoft software. The fight did not end well for Apple. In a few years, Microsoft all but sidelined Apple, and the company almost went out of business.

Can Apple, which insists on tight control of its devices, win in an intensely competitive market against rivals that are openly licensing their software to scores of companies? It faces that challenge not only in phones, but also in the market for tablet computers, where the iPad is about to take on a similar set of rivals.

“This is a really big strategic question,” said Toni Sacconaghi, an analyst with Sanford C. Bernstein and Company. “No one knows whether openness will ultimately prevail as it did on the PC.”

Apple declined to comment on the issue.

By some measures, the competition Apple faces this time is even more formidable than it was in PCs. In addition to the Android family, Apple already competes with Research In Motion, maker of the BlackBerry.

And the iPhone will soon have one more powerful, and familiar, foe: Microsoft. That company’s well-reviewed Windows Phone 7 software will appear in as many as nine new smartphones beginning next month. Others like Nokia cannot be counted out.

Read more at www.nytimes.com

Steve Jobs’s Android Obsession Analyzed

Could Google’s Android be keeping Steve Job’s up at night and if so, what is he going to do about it? Leave to Fastcompany.com to put a great spin on the topic.

Amplify’d from www.fastcompany.com

Yesterday, Apple CEO Steve Jobs made a surprise appearance on Apple’s earnings call, largely to offer a rant about why the iPhone is superior to the “fragmented” Android platform. Since rants are always ripe treatment for word clouds, we made one (above).

What sort of glimpse into Jobs’s psyche does the cloud offer (besides the fact that he’s apparently much more articulate than Mark Zuckerberg)?

No sense ignoring the elephant in the cloud: “Android” clearly made more appearances than any other word, by far. One might be tempted to read fear or obsession into the repetition of his rival’s name — self-possessed politicians usually settle for “my opponent,” after all — until we scrutinize some of the other words that made prominent appearances.

“Integrated” and “fragmented” were buzzwords, as we noted yesterday, since these were the adjectives Jobs favors over “closed” and “open,” words used by Google’s CEO to describe the iPhone versus the Android. Jobs’s central point is that Apple devices, by working more or less the same way across the board, ensure simplicty for app developers and users — a point reinforced by three other prominent words: “developers,” “software,” and “apps.”

So yes, the Android weighs heavily upon Jobs’s mind; and his dreams are more than likely populated with ravenous green robots consuming everything in their path.

Meanwhile, Google’s Android guru Andy Rubin has fired off a tweet, apparently in code, making the point that Android is the very definition of open. “mkdir android ; cd android ; repo init -u git://android.git.kernel.org/platform/manifest.git ; repo sync ; make,” Rubin wrote.

What do Rubin’s word cloud dreams look like, I wonder?

Earlier: Jobs Takes a Swing at Android, BlackBerry

Read more at www.fastcompany.com

Google Nexus One is Nexus Last while HTC heads towards dominating the space!

So, uh… should I be purchasing an HTC? First I fall in love with my Blackberry, then my iPhone. Question, how many darn smartphones does one Geek Diva need to stay relevant?

So last week in less than six weeks from its launch, Microsoft killed its two first phone models and the whole handset project known as Kin. And before we have had time to even digest and understand all the undertones of that bizarre end to a ‘strategy’ we now see another death in the smartphones space.

GOOGLE NEXUS ONE IS NEXUS LAST

The CEO of Google, Eric Schmidt announced earlier this week that there won’t be another Nexus. No Nexus Two. So their first attempt at making a ‘superphone’ (that was a silly term for it) ended a superdud. And rather than try to learn and make it better (something Apple managed tremendously well where its original iPhone 2 was not being accepted internationally), Google decides to end its line of superphones. This is no doubt welcome news to all the 30 or so manufacturers who are committed to the Android platform, to see that Google is not going to compete with them. That initial launch of Nexus One with its ‘proprietary’ gains to the OS, seemed very unfair at the time. But as we ponder how poorly Google managed its smartphones on the Android platform, consider HTC here next.

HTC SALES JUMP AND PROFITS TOO

HTC announces a monster Q2 quarter. Remember that RIM grew its sales by 6% from Q1, a very healthy growth rate (and in the previous quarter from Q4 to Q1, Nokia grew 3% and Apple was flat) – HTC is now so hot, it grew 36% from Q1 to Q2. They sold 4.5 million smartphones. I make it that about 30% of all Android phones sold globally today are made by HTC.Read more at communities-dominate.blogs.com