Tag Archives: advertising

5

Five Digital Media Updates Making Headlines

3Here are five digital media news stories ripped from the headlines. I’m most interested in Amazon’s entry into the Internet of Things, one of my tech obsessions and Periscope’s new On Air Button. I’ll be using Periscope to do a live broadcast of my “Social Media For Nonprofits” talk at The Daily Good Conference and to broadcast the breakaway sessions. I’ll report back on my user experience with the web page interface after the conference. In the meantime, here are my picks for the top five digital media news stories making headlines.

Variety: Snapchat Shutters Original Content Channel

Snapchat is laying off members of a team assigned to a channel on its Discover platform devoted to original programming, dubbed Snap Channel.

The closure has prompted the exit of Marcus Wiley, a former executive with broadcast network Fox who was brought on to figure out how Snapchat would build up its programming lineup. Since his hire in May, Wiley led a group of 15 that has been disbanded, with some being pink-slipped and others being reassigned elsewhere in the company.

Until its removal from Discover a few weeks ago, Snap was the home of short-form content produced internally at Snapchat since launching in January. The channel was once home to ‘Literally Can’t Even,’ a split-screen comedy series starring and written by Sasha Spielberg, daughter of Steven Spielberg, and Emily Goldwyn, daughter of John Goldwyn”

TNW: Periscope now has an embeddable ‘On Air’ button for broadcasts

“Periscope now has an On Air button for websites that tell everyone when a broadcast is live.

It’s a useful little tweak that anyone can use. All you have to do is enter your Periscope username (typically your Twitter handle without the ‘@‘) into Periscope’s button generator, and it creates a code so you can embed a button into a webpage. Your username takes the place of the ‘broadcaster’ text, seen below.

Screen Shot 2015-10-07 at 1.40.32 PM

Periscope’s On Air button also comes in two sizes, and automatically toggles when a broadcast goes live.”

Re/code: Twitter Unveils New Video Advertising Strategy

“The company is taking a different approach to video ads. More precisely: Twitter is adopting YouTube’s video advertising approach. What that means is that publishers and video makers can upload their video to Twitter, and Twitter will attach short ‘pre-roll’ ads in front of those clips and split the ad revenue with the video owners. Which is how YouTube, the world’s biggest video site, does it, too.”

TechCrunch: Amazon Launches AWS IoT — A Platform For Building, Managing And Analyzing The Internet Of Things

“Make way for another big player entering the Internet of Things space. Amazon today is announcing its long-awaited IoT platform for AWS at its re:Invent developer conference in Las Vegas. As Amazon describes it, it is a managed cloud platform ‘that lets connected devices easily and securely interact with cloud applications and other devices.’ The platform, which is launching in beta, will be able to support billions of devices and trillions of messages, ‘and can process and route those messages to AWS endpoints and to other devices reliably and securely.’ AWS IoT will integrate with Lambda, Amazon Kinesis, Amazon S3, Amazon Machine Learning, and Amazon DynamoDB to build IoT applications, manage infrastructure and analyze data.”

Advertising Age: Reuters Is the Latest to Try Reinventing News With Digital TV Service

“Early next year, the company plans to introduce Reuters.TV, an ad-supported digital service that allows subscribers to receive personalized video content created solely for the platform. Reuters.TV will cost a monthly fee, but the company declined to say how much it will be. The service will initially be available on iPhones and iPads.”

Digital

Digital Media News: Closing Out The Week With Five Things To Know

Ripped from the headlines, here are five things you should know this week for your digital and social media professional development.

Copyblogger: The Savvy Marketer’s Checklist for Seductive Landing Pages – Ever wonder what you could do to stop people from bouncing off your landing pages? You work hard to polish your sales copy. You’ve even recorded a snazzy demonstration video. But when you check your site’s analytics? You feel soooo frustrated. And the worst thing is … you don’t know what else you can do. How can you improve your conversion rates? Use the 40 tips in our landing page checklist to see where you’ve gone wrong. Or, use the checklist to create a landing page from scratch. See your email list grow faster, your webinars sell out, and your product sales go through the roof.

Here's What's NewRe/code: Twitter vs. Meerkat – Meerkat, the undisputed belle of the 2015 SXSW ball, was hobbled by Twitter’s mid-festival announcement of its acquisition of rival Periscope. The social video-sharing app had achieved a healthy dose of buzz for its savvy integration with the Twitter platform. Yet within hours of the news of its Periscope acquisition, Twitter fired the torpedoes: Informing its upstart rival that it would no longer have access to Twitter’s social graphing capabilities, which allowed Meerkat users to automatically push their livestreams out to their Twitter followers without building a separate contact list in the Meerkat app. Platform owner has significant power. Startup building on that platform is vulnerable. Platform owner capitalizes on its clout and attempts to move in for the kill. Sound familiar? It’s the hypothetical worst-case scenario so often cited by proponents of Title II net neutrality regulations — proponents including Twitter itself. [ED NOTE: This is the one to watch]

POLITICO: The Mobile Election – How smartphones will change the 2016 presidential race -As Hillary Clinton prepares for the formal launch of her campaign, and as Jeb Bush and Scott Walker are neck and neck in the polls, roughly two out of every three American adults, or 64 percent, own a smartphone, according to a new report from Pew. On the consumption side, the rise in mobile will “change politics the same way it is changing American life broadly,” said Ben Smith, the editor-in-chief of BuzzFeed. “People will organize and persuade on mobile devices and apps, the same way they live on them more broadly. Though mobile usage is highest among younger Americans, news consumption is “common even among older smartphone owners,” as “four-in-ten smartphone owners ages 65 and older use their phone at least occasionally to keep up with breaking news.” On the media side, the rise in mobile usage will increase the number of citizen reporters, whose influence on recent political campaigns has been quite significant. Video footage of an errant remark — from George Allen’s “Macaca” moment in 2006 to Mitt Romney’s “47 percent” moment in 2012 — can have more influence on a political campaign than any traditional news report.

Forbes: The Rise Of The Female CDO – The Chief Digital Officer is one role where women are outpacing men by two to one, according to a FierceCIO article citing research by Gartner , which also notes that the number of CDOs who are women has been growing dramatically every year. There are certainly some prominent examples, including Rachel Haot, CDO for New York State (and previously the City of New York), who was chosen Chief Digital Officer of the Year in 2014 by the CDO Club. Others include Jessica Federer at Bayer , Linda Avery of the Federal Reserve and Julie Bornstein, who holds the positions of both CMO and CDO of Sephora . [ED NOTE: Yay! That is all.]

1Harvard Business Review: Defining Strategy, Implementation, and Execution – It is striking how much confusion there is between strategy, implementation, and execution. Is “strategy” a matter of making choices about where we want to go, where we play and how we win, of setting goals and actions, about how we create and capture economic value over time? Is “getting things done” what we mean by implementation or execution? Do you “execute” or “implement” a strategy? And can you separate these from strategy formation? For strategy wonks like me, thinking about the definitions of these ideas provides endless fascination. For many business leaders, however, I find that the semantics matter a lot less. And that’s too bad because the semantics should matter. There are meaningful distinctions between strategy, implementation, and execution that are helpful to running a company or business in the real world. Ignoring, blurring, or getting them wrong creates sloppy thinking, deciding, and doing at all levels of an organization. Let’s start with strategy.

Content Marketing: The Art of Communication

Great content is a powerful marketing tool .  Why is it so powerful?  With the use of your content, you can build communities and tell a story about your organization, your company’s mission or your personal brand. 

Social media, mobile technology, and word-of-mouth marketing have been serious game changers. People today are getting their news online, watching TV from their mobile devices and subscribing to magazines via tablets.  This lends itself to three points:

  • Traditional advertising is dead
  • Content marketing is the new traditional advertising
  • Content is King

According to Entrepreneur.com, a survey by HiveFire, discovered that traditional marketing, such as print, TV and radio advertising is being replaced with more non-traditional means of content marketing.  What is content marketing?  The Content Marketing Institute reports:

“Content marketing is the art of communicating with your customers and prospects without selling. It is non-interruption marketing. Instead of pitching your products or services, you are delivering information that makes your buyer more intelligent. The essence of content strategy is the belief that if we, as businesses, deliver consistent, ongoing valuable information to buyers, they ultimately reward us with their business and loyalty”

This includes blog posts, social media sites, videos and photos used for the purpose of generating leads, enhancing a brand’s visibility, and putting the company’s ability on display.  But your blog, Facebook page and Tweets are just the means to get the message out.  The real value is in the content that you share.

Twitter Targets Small, Medium Businesses with New Ad Platform

Twitter is looking to make more money. Are you a business owner? If so, this is where you come in.

Amplify’d from www.mediabistro.com

Twitter needs to make some money this year. As eMarketer predicts, Twitter will make $150 million in advertising revenue this year – and the company is doing everything they can to get there. While most of us have seen Promoted Tweets from big name companies like Coca-Cola, Dell and Ford, Twitter is shifting gears a bit and starting to focus on small- and medium-sized businesses for its advertising products.

Twitter’s upcoming self-serve advertising dashboard (the beta version of which has been leaked) is aimed towards small and medium businesses looking to expand their marketing efforts.

As the Wall Street Journal reports, those beta testers already trying out the dashboard are seeing some pretty significant successes. David Szetela, owner of an online-ad agency Clix Marketing, reportedly saw hundreds of pre-orders of his client Guy Kawasaki’s new book “Enchantment” through ads on Twitter. The ads reportedly cost more than $4,000, but he spent less money on Twitter than on Facebook or Google overall, and saw more pre-orders.

It makes sense that Twitter would start with big businesses like Coca-Cola as founding beta testers of its advertising program. These companies have the capital to risk on an unproven marketing plan. But it’s time now to woo the small- and medium-sized businesses, which make up a significant portion of online advertising sales outside of Twitter. If the company can get these businesses on board, they’ll likely meet or exceed the $150 million in advertising revenue that eMarketer predicts.

Twitter is being valued at over $4 billion now with the recent interest from JPMorgan looking to own 10% of the company for a $450 million investment from its social media fund. The company will have to seriously step up its advertising offerings to small- and medium-sized businesses if it wants to maintain this valuation throughout 2011 and exceed it in the coming years.

 

Microsoft’s Golden Globes ads celebrate underdog status

Microsoft’s ads ask us to stand out from the crowd and “Be What’s Next.” OK, but I’m still not using Bing OR your phone.

Amplify’d from news.cnet.com

I confess to having a soft spot for much of Microsoft’s recent advertising. Mainly because it bothers to appeal to my soft spot.

The company decided to use the glamour of the Golden Globes ceremony to remind people of their innate love for the underdog. In this case, the struggling, table-waiting, eating-out-of-a-tin actor.

In new ads, we see what appears to be an audition. Actors express their love of their craft, their commitment to it. They end with a different Microsoft brand “precongratulating” the Golden Globes stars of tomorrow and offering the tagline “Be What’s Next.”

The most moving line is offered by an actor who says, “I’d rather fail at this than succeed at doing anything else.”

In showing such vulnerable emotions, Microsoft is, perhaps, trying to help you change your perception that it is this big, nasty monolith with all the warm feelings of a Nordic Genghis Khan.

Perhaps it is reminding you that Windows Phone and Bing are charming underdogs who, one day, with your undying support, could win the Golden Globes of mobile and search.

See more at news.cnet.com

Google shares “Display advertising is transforming rapidly, and is at a critical inflection point.”

Google has put together “Watch This Space” to see how advertisers are currently innovating in this space and to offer advertising solutions.

 

I found out about this site from a New York Times ad. I’m sure the Google analytic team sent me an email about it earlier. It must have gotten lost among their many, many, other emails, so I probably just ignored it. Interestingly enough, I found out about this new Google offering the good fashioned way, from a print newspaper ad. Go figure. Why do I find that simply hilarious!

By 2014, nearly two-thirds of all U.S. Internet users will be regular visitors to social networks

It’s good to know my social networking addiction and the way I make a living will not be going away anytime soon (if at all). Social network usage will rise sharply in 2010, according to a report by eMarketer. The number of people visiting social networks on a monthly basis in the U.S. will reach 127 million, or about 57 percent of all domestic Internet users, by the end of 2010, a 16 percent increase over 2009. By 2014, two-thirds (65.8 percent) of U.S. Internet users will be regular visitors to social networks, the firm reported. This is looking REALLY good for the home team

Amplify’d from www.adweek.com

“Marketers on social networks are on the cusp of something trulyexciting: a critical mass of engaged consumers who are willing toparticipate, share and spread the word about the companies andbrands they love,” said Debra Aho Williamson, a senior analyst ateMarketer.

“But if there ever were a time to assure consumers that theirinformation is safe and secure, and to make sure that their brandinteractions on social networks are positive, that time is now,”she added.Read more at www.adweek.com